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Fugitive Colours - cover

Fugitive Colours

Liz Lochhead

Publisher: Birlinn

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Summary

“The wit and swagger” of this collection by the celebrated Scottish poet “belie a skill as a technician that she shares with the greats” (Scotsman, UK). This poetry collection by Liz Lochhead features never before published work along with poems written during her time as Scots Makar—Scotland’s national poet. They from commissioned works, such as ‘Connecting Cultures’, written for the Commonwealth Games in 2014 to more personal works, such as ‘Favourite Place’, about holidays in the west coast with her late husband. Throughout her career, Lochhead has been described variously as a poet, feminist-playwright, translator and broadcaster but has said that ‘when somebody asks me what I do I usually say writer. The most precious thing to me is to be a poet. If I were a playwright, I’d like to be a poet in the theatre.’

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