Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Defending the Faith - The Russian Orthodox Church and the Demise of Religious Pluralism  - cover

Defending the Faith - The Russian Orthodox Church and the Demise of Religious Pluralism 

Lincoln E. Flake

Publisher: ibidem

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Freedom of religious expression and assembly has never been under greater threat in post-Soviet Russia. The infamous Yarovaya Law of 2016 has made good on previous legislative endeavors to curtail the activities of undesirable religious entities. Behind the curtain, the influence of the Russian Orthodox Church looms large over state policy and the decline in religious liberties and pluralism.

Lincoln E. Flake explains the church’s hostility to nontraditional groups as a consequence of historical-structural factors arising from its Soviet experience and immediate-strategic factors arising from its experience in the post-Soviet religious free market. 

It was not until the 2014 annexation of Crimea that church-state interests coincided to produce unprecedented collusion. The Church, which had previously only served symbolic purposes for domestic political advantage, was now required for more meaningful ‘active measures’ in Russia’s all-of-government approach to advancing its national security strategy. Reciprocation produced the Yarovaya Law and further quid pro quos account for the relapse into religious intolerance. 

This study contextualizes the church’s present-day posture on religious pluralism by appealing both to historical experience and insights that Rational Choice Theory offers to the study of religious actors and religious behavior.
Available since: 05/18/2021.
Print length: 282 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Tartaria - Ancient Greece did not exist - cover

    Tartaria - Ancient Greece did...

    David Ewing Jr

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Ancient Greece is famous for astronomy and philosophy. Historians and scientists say that the Ancient Greeks said that the Earth was round like a ball.
     
    Did Ancient Greece really exist?
     
    The NASA space program “Apollo” was named after the Ancient Greeks. Why?
     
    On 19 July 1969, Neil Armstrong arrived on the Moon. 19? Why 19?
     
    Neil Armstrong walked on the Moon on 20 July 1969. Did this really happen? - Or -Is everything a big lie?Did the Ancient Greeks really exist?
     
    This book will examine the evidence and show that Ancient Greece never existed and is nothing but a scam
    Show book
  • Tartaria - Skull and Bones - English - cover

    Tartaria - Skull and Bones -...

    David Ewing Jr

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    There are thousands of skulls and bones hiding underground in the basements of many churches and cathedrals - Why?Did they eat people in churches? Did they drink blood in churches?Drinking human blood … was common in Europe 200 years ago - why?Eating humans - cannibalism was common in Europe 200 years ago - why?Cooking people alive in Europe was commonHow many people did they eat in Europe, during and after the Middle Ages? The Truth about Vampires and Christianity
    Show book