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Thousands - cover

Thousands

Lightsey Darst

Publisher: Coffee House Press

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Summary

Praise for Lightsey Darst: 
"This is a vital poetry of the Deep South ripe with bones, blood and bogs, Snow Whites, Gretels and debutantes all stirred into a harrowing stew of lust, dusk and summer." —New York Times 
"A terrific collection. . . . Full of horror, bleak humor, and suspense, these poems read like mini-thrillers, daring you to put the book down." — Entertainment Weekly 
Desire & the page felt it.I told myself, something is happening.You could make weather happen then.  
Dear not only in dream life, dear never until storm.

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