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Through The Looking Grass - cover

Through The Looking Grass

Lewis Carroll

Publisher: anamsaleem

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Summary

Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass, from 1871, is a children's novel that is often put in the genre "literary nonsense". Although its the sequel of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland it doesn't reference events of the first book; but some of its settings and themes do form a kind of mirror image of Wonderland. While playing with her kittens, Alice wonders what life would be like on the other side of the mirror. Much to her astonishment she passes through it into an alternate world and discovers looking-glass poetry and talking flowers and becomes a piece in a game of chess played by the Red Queen against the White Queen.
Available since: 12/08/2018.

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