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Stop don't read this - cover

Stop don't read this

Leonora Rustamova

Publisher: Bluemoose Books

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Summary

To keep five disaffected teenage lads in her YR 11 class in school, their teacher, Leonora Rstamova wrote a story about and for them. They were in danger of being excluded but they all finished their exams. She was sacked, or was she saved for writing this story.

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