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Lessons of October - cover

Lessons of October

Leon Trotsky

Publisher: Haymarket Books

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Summary

In this sharply polemical account, Leon Trotsky draws up a balance sheet of the world's first successful workers' revolution. Written primarily for members of the newly created Communist International, Trotsky focuses on the specific role played by the Bolshevik Party in leading Russian workers to victory.

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