If you like reading, you will LOVE reading without limits!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Christmas Fiction Off the Beaten Path - cover

Christmas Fiction Off the Beaten Path

Laurie Lucking, JPC Allen, Michelle L. Levigne, Sandra Merville Hart, Ronnell Kay GIbson, Patricia Meredith

Publisher: Mt. Zion Ridge Press

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Not your Granny's Christmas stories … 
Step off the beaten path and enjoy six stories that look beyond the expected, the traditional, the tried-and-true. 
Inspired by the song, Mary Did You Know? -- a mother's memories of events leading up to and following that one holy night. MARY, DID YOU KNOW? 
A young woman seeking her own identity searches for the man who tried to kill her and her mother on Christmas Eve twenty years before. A ROSE FROM THE ASHES 
Princess, tower, sorceress, dragon, brave knight, clever peasant -- combine these ingredients into a Christmas-time story that isn't quite what you'd expect. RETURN TO CALLIDORA 
Anticipating tough financial times, the decision not to buy or exchange presents leads to some painful and surprising revelations for a hardworking man and his family. NOT THIS YEAR 
Years ago, a gunman and a store full of hostages learned some important lessons about faith and pain and what really matters in life -- and the echoes from that day continue to the present. THOSE WHO STAYED 
A community of refugees, a brutal winter, a doorway to another world -- a touch of magic creating holiday joy for others leads to a Christmas wish fulfilled. CRYSTAL CHRISTMAS

Other books that might interest you

  • Nordic Tales - Folktales from Norway Sweden Finland Iceland and Denmark - cover

    Nordic Tales - Folktales from...

    Books Chronicle

    • 7
    • 26
    • 0
    Trolls haunt the snowy forests, and terrifying monsters roam the open sea.A young woman journeys to the end of the world, and a boy proves he knows no fear.This collection of 16 traditional tales transports readers to the enchanting world of Nordic folklore. Translated and transcribed by folklorists in the 19th century, and presented here unabridged, the stories are by turns magical, hilarious, cozy, and chilling. They offer a fascinating view into Nordic culture and a comforting wintertime read. Ulla Thynell's glowing contemporary illustrations accompany each tale, conjuring dragons, princesses, and the northern lights.
    Show book
  • Of Gods and Men - 100 Stories from Ancient Greece and Rome - cover

    Of Gods and Men - 100 Stories...

    Daisy Dunn

    • 1
    • 10
    • 0
    Daisy Dunn offers a deeply researched collection of stories reflecting the eclectic richness and depth of the classical literary canon. 
     
    Striking a balance between the 'classic classic' (such as Dryden's translation of the Aeneid) and the less familiar or expected, Of Gods and Men ranges from the epic poetry of Homer to the histories of Arrian and Diodorus Siculus and the sprawling Theogony of Hesiod; from the tragedies of Aeschylus and Euripides to the biographies of Suetonius and Plutarch and the pen portraits of Theophrastus; and from the comedies of Plautus to the the fictions of Petronius and Apuleius. 
     
    Of Gods and Men is embellished by translations from writers as diverse as Queen Elizabeth I (Boethius), Percy Bysshe Shelley (Plato), Walter Pater (Apuleius's Golden Ass), Lawrence of Arabia (Homer's Odyssey), Louis MacNeice (Aeschylus's Agamemnon) and Ted Hughes (Ovid's Pygmalion), as well as a number of accomplished translations by Daisy herself.
    Show book
  • Who's Who of British Crime - cover

    Who's Who of British Crime

    Jim Morris

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    The Who's Who of British Crime spans the whole twentieth century, and covers an enormous range of crimes and misdemeanours - by turns appalling, brilliant, gruesome and audacious. All the nation's most famous wrongdoers are here, from the mystery of Lord Lucan to the Great Train Robbery, the Brinks-Mat robbers and Jeffrey Archer. And it's not just the villains; some of the twentieth century's top lawyers and police officers are included for the part they have played in upholding the principles of the law. An unsavoury roll call of the men and women whose misdeeds live on in the national memory, an exploration of some of our most notorious unsolved cases and a celebration of the advances made in the fight against crime, this guide tracks the changing face of criminal activity over 100 years.
    Show book
  • Toxic Love - The Shocking True Story of the First Murder by Cancer - cover

    Toxic Love - The Shocking True...

    Tomás Guillén

    • 0
    • 4
    • 0
    The chilling true story of romantic obsession and murder by cancer from the New York Times–bestselling author of The Search for the Green River Killer.Omaha, Nebraska, 1978. Sandy Johnson was in shock. Her husband, Duane, and young daughter, Sherrie, were violently ill when word arrived that her infant nephew just died of mysterious causes. Days earlier, the entire family was happy, healthy, and living the American dream. Now they were at the center of a terrifying medical crisis.   Duane soon died in a condition unlike anything the doctors had ever seen. As they raced to discover what disease or toxin could have done so much damage so quickly, Lt. Foster Burchard of the Omaha police began to suspect foul play. Sandy herself became a primary suspect, as did her ex-boyfriend Steven Harper—a man prone to violence who never got over their breakup.   In Toxic Love, investigative reporter and true crime author Tomás Guillén offers a detailed and vivid account of this baffling case from the day of the poisoning to the harrowing trial and the murderer’s eventual suicide on death row.  
    Show book
  • The Wanderings of a Spiritualist - cover

    The Wanderings of a Spiritualist

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Arthur Conan Doyle (1859 – 1930) was an English writer best known for his detective stories about Sherlock Holmes. “The Wanderings of a Spiritualist” is an essay compiling author's memories of lecturing tours across Australia, New Zealand, the USA, and Canada. 
    Arthur Conan Doyle, in full Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (born May 22, 1859, Edinburgh, Scotland—died July 7, 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, England), Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes—one of the most vivid and enduring characters in English fiction.
    The Adventure of Silver Blaze. 'Holmes gave me a sketch of the events'. Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson on train to Devon to investigate murder and disappearance of a famous racehorse. Arthur Conan Doyle story published in The Strand Magazine, London, 1892
    Conan Doyle, the second of Charles Altamont and Mary Foley Doyle’s 10 children, began seven years of Jesuit education in Lancashire, England, in 1868. After an additional year of schooling in Feldkirch, Austria, Conan Doyle returned to Edinburgh. Through the influence of Dr. Bryan Charles Waller, his mother’s lodger, he prepared for entry into the University of Edinburgh’s Medical School. He received Bachelor of Medicine and Master of Surgery qualifications from Edinburgh in 1881 and an M.D. in 1885 upon completing his thesis, “An Essay upon the Vasomotor Changes in Tabes Dorsalis.”
    While a medical student, Conan Doyle was deeply impressed by the skill of his professor, Dr. Joseph Bell, in observing the most minute detail regarding a patient’s condition. This master of diagnostic deduction became the model for Conan Doyle’s literary creation, Sherlock Holmes, who first appeared in A Study in Scarlet, a novel-length story published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual of 1887. Other aspects of Conan Doyle’s medical education and experiences appear in his semiautobiographical novels, The Firm of Girdlestone (1890) and The Stark Munro Letters (1895), and in the collection of medical short stories Round the Red Lamp (1894). (See also Sherlock Holmes: Pioneer in Forensic Science.) Conan Doyle’s creation of the logical, cold, calculating Holmes, the “world’s first and only consulting detective,” sharply contrasted with the paranormal beliefs Conan Doyle addressed in a short novel of this period, The Mystery of Cloomber (1889). Conan Doyle’s early interest in both scientifically supportable evidence and certain paranormal phenomena exemplified the complex diametrically opposing beliefs he struggled with throughout his life.
    Driven by public clamour, Conan Doyle continued writing Sherlock Holmes adventures through 1926. His short stories were collected in several volumes, and he also wrote novels (e.g., The Hound of the Baskervilles, serialized 1901–02) that feature Holmes and his assistant, Dr. Watson. Conan Doyle, however, claimed the success of Holmes overshadowed the merit he believed his other historical fiction deserved, most notably his tale of 14th-century chivalry, The White Company (1891), its companion piece, Sir Nigel (1906), and his adventures of the Napoleonic war hero Brigadier Gerard and the 19th-century skeptical scientist Professor George Edward Challenger.
    Facts Matter. Support the truth and unlock all of Britannica’s content. 
     
    Show book
  • The Coming of the Fairies - cover

    The Coming of the Fairies

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Best remembered for his creation of Sherlock Holmes, the world's first consulting detective and a dedicated adherent to logic, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in later life became fascinated by the occult. 
    Arthur Conan Doyle, in full Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (born May 22, 1859, Edinburgh, Scotland—died July 7, 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, England), Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes—one of the most vivid and enduring characters in English fiction.
    The Adventure of Silver Blaze. 'Holmes gave me a sketch of the events'. Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson on train to Devon to investigate murder and disappearance of a famous racehorse. Arthur Conan Doyle story published in The Strand Magazine, London, 1892
    Conan Doyle, the second of Charles Altamont and Mary Foley Doyle’s 10 children, began seven years of Jesuit education in Lancashire, England, in 1868. After an additional year of schooling in Feldkirch, Austria, Conan Doyle returned to Edinburgh. Through the influence of Dr. Bryan Charles Waller, his mother’s lodger, he prepared for entry into the University of Edinburgh’s Medical School. He received Bachelor of Medicine and Master of Surgery qualifications from Edinburgh in 1881 and an M.D. in 1885 upon completing his thesis, “An Essay upon the Vasomotor Changes in Tabes Dorsalis.”
    While a medical student, Conan Doyle was deeply impressed by the skill of his professor, Dr. Joseph Bell, in observing the most minute detail regarding a patient’s condition. This master of diagnostic deduction became the model for Conan Doyle’s literary creation, Sherlock Holmes, who first appeared in A Study in Scarlet, a novel-length story published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual of 1887. Other aspects of Conan Doyle’s medical education and experiences appear in his semiautobiographical novels, The Firm of Girdlestone (1890) and The Stark Munro Letters (1895), and in the collection of medical short stories Round the Red Lamp (1894). (See also Sherlock Holmes: Pioneer in Forensic Science.) Conan Doyle’s creation of the logical, cold, calculating Holmes, the “world’s first and only consulting detective,” sharply contrasted with the paranormal beliefs Conan Doyle addressed in a short novel of this period, The Mystery of Cloomber (1889). Conan Doyle’s early interest in both scientifically supportable evidence and certain paranormal phenomena exemplified the complex diametrically opposing beliefs he struggled with throughout his life.
    Driven by public clamour, Conan Doyle continued writing Sherlock Holmes adventures through 1926. His short stories were collected in several volumes, and he also wrote novels (e.g., The Hound of the Baskervilles, serialized 1901–02) that feature Holmes and his assistant, Dr. Watson. Conan Doyle, however, claimed the success of Holmes overshadowed the merit he believed his other historical fiction deserved, most notably his tale of 14th-century chivalry, The White Company (1891), its companion piece, Sir Nigel (1906), and his adventures of the Napoleonic war hero Brigadier Gerard and the 19th-century skeptical scientist Professor George Edward Challenger.
    Facts Matter. Support the truth and unlock all of Britannica’s content. 
     
    Show book