Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
The Infinitesimals - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have more than 500,000 other books you can enjoy!

The Infinitesimals

Laura Kasischke

Publisher: Copper Canyon Press

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Winner of 2012 NBCC awardHer last collection of poetry, Space, in Chains made it onto several “best of” lists for 2011, and was well-reviewed by The New York Times, The Boston Review, and others.Kasischke, a successful novelist, is known especially for her narrative expertise and her masterful use of sound.Has lived and worked in Michigan her entire life, and many of her poems draw from the suburban landscape of the Midwest.Her fiction work is particularly popular in France.Two of her novels have been turned into successful feature films.She has received fellowships from both the Guggenheim foundation and the NEA.
Available since: 07/06/2015.

Other books that might interest you

  • A Hotel Lobby at the Edge of the World - Poems - cover

    A Hotel Lobby at the Edge of the...

    Adam Clay

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “At the edge of the world, you’ll want to have this book. The final lines of Adam Clay’s poem, ‘Scientific Method,’ have been haunting me for weeks.” —Iowa Press-Citizen 
     
    The distilled, haunting, and subtly complex poems in Adam Clay’s A Hotel Lobby at the Edge of the World often arrive at that moment when solitude slips into separation, when a person suddenly realizes he can barely see the place he set out from however long ago. He now sees he must find his connection back to the present, socially entangled world in which he lives. For Clay, reverie can be a siren’s song, luring him to that space in which prisoners will begin “to interrogate themselves.” 
     
    Clay pays attention to the poet’s return to the world of his daily life, tracking the subtly shifting tenors of thought that occur as the landscape around him changes. Clay is fully aware of the difficulties of Thoreau’s “border life,” and his poems live somewhere between those of James Wright and John Ashbery: They seek wholeness, all the while acknowledging that “a fragment is as complete as thought can be.” In the end, what we encounter most in these poems is a generous gentleness—an attention to the world so careful it’s as if the mind is “washing each grain of sand.” 
     
    “Poems that are in turn clear and strange, and always warmly memorable.” —Bob Hicok 
     
    “These poems engage fully the natural world . . . even as they understand the individual’s exclusion from it.” —Publishers Weekly
    Show book
  • Henrietta Volume 1 (dramatic reading) - cover

    Henrietta Volume 1 (dramatic...

    Charlotte Lennox

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Henrietta is a strong willed young lady who will not give in to her aunt and marry the suitors she proposes. She runs away and adventure ensues. However she meets one young man who she is quite taken with but he does not share all about himself and Henrietta finds herself in some tricky situations. (Summary by Michele Eaton)This Librivox audiobook is a dramatic reading of volume 1 of this book.Cast list:Henrietta Courteney (Clelia): Michele EatonMiss Woodby (Celinda): Amanda FridayMrs Eccles: Victoria PLady Manning: Elizabeth KlettCoachman, Chaplain and Earl Courtney: tovarischTall Lean Woman: Arielle LipshawFat Jolly Woman, Mrs Willis and Servant Girl: ElleyKatGrave Man and First Officer: Kevin W. DavidsonYoung Man on the Coach, Mr Damer, Young Lord and Young Mr Courteney: ToddHWOld Gentlewoman, Old Woman Nurse and Miss Carlton (Henrietta's Mother): Patti CunninghamSecond Officer and Isaac Darby: Ric FMrs Carlton (Henrietta's Grandmother): Lynne ThompsonLady Meadows: CaprishaPageMrs White and Mrs Damer: Kristin GjerløwYoung Mr Damer: balaNarrator Book 1 (except chapter 6) and Chapter 1 of Book 2: LovedayNarrator Book 2 (except chapter 1) and Chapter 6 of Book 1: KHand
    Show book
  • Poems of Marianne Moore - cover

    Poems of Marianne Moore

    Marianne Moore

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In 1921, American poet H.D. collected and published a selection of previously published poems by Marianne Moore. Although this angered Moore, as it was entirely unauthorized, she later accepted the edition as well made and used it as the basis for her own 1924 publication of  Observations. Moore's unique poetry matches the experimentation underway during the American Modernist movement. Much of it incorporates seemingly out-of-place quotations into complex free verse that often uses Nature as a subject matter.Today, despite the self-motivated alteration of her poetry in later life, done much to the dismay of her devotees, scholars consider Moore a significant American poet worthy of intense study in an a unalterable place in the canon.(Summary by Oscar Goff)
    Show book
  • Freeman's: Family - cover

    Freeman's: Family

    John Freeman

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A diverse anthology of new fiction, essays, poetry, and photography exploring the subject of family from this “illustrious new literary journal” (Vogue.com). 
     
    Following his acclaimed debut issue of collected writing on the theme of “Arrival,” the renowned editor and critic John Freeman circles a topic of constantly shifting definitions and endless fascination for writers: family. 
     
    In an essay called “Crossroads,” Aminatta Forna muses on the legacy of slavery as she settles her family in Washington, DC—a place where she is routinely accused of cutting in line when she stands next to her white husband. Award-winning novelist Claire Vaye Watkins delivers a stunning portrait of a woman in the throes of postpartum depression. Booker Prize winner Marlon James takes the focus off absent fathers to write about his mother, who calls to sing him happy birthday every year. Novelist Claire Messud’s writes of the two four-legged tyrants in her home; Sandra Cisneros muses about her extended family of past lovers; and Aleksandar Hemon tells the story of his uncle’s desperate attempt to remain a communist despite decades in the Soviet gulag. 
     
    With outstanding, never-before-published pieces of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry from literary heavyweights and up-and-coming writers alike, Freeman’s: Family collects the most amusing, heartbreaking, and probing stories about family life emerging today.
    Show book
  • Brontes The: The Poems: Volume 2 - cover

    Brontes The: The Poems: Volume 2

    Charlotte Bronte, Anne Bronte,...

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Perhaps England’s greatest literary family. To find one brilliant novelist in a family is extremely rare. But two? Three?The Brontë sisters, Charlotte, Emily Jane and Anne, together with their brother Patrick, are famed throughout the world. And amongst their many talents was poetry. Of course, being Brontë’s, they were rather good at that too.These poems are read for you by the very fine Anna Bentinck, David Shaw-Parker, Eve Karpf and Jo Wyatt.
    Show book
  • Elegiac Sonnets and Other Poems - cover

    Elegiac Sonnets and Other Poems

    Charlotte Turner Smith

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Charlotte Turner Smith (1749 – 1806) was an English poet and novelist. She initiated a revival of the English sonnet, helped establish the conventions of Gothic fiction, and wrote political novels of sensibility.It was in 1784, in debtor's prison with her husband Benjamin, that she wrote and published her first work, Elegiac Sonnets. The work achieved instant success, allowing Charlotte to pay for their release from prison. Smith's sonnets helped initiate a revival of the form and granted an aura of respectability to her later novels.Stuart Curran, the editor of Smith's poems, has written that Smith is "the first poet in England whom in retrospect we would call Romantic". She helped shape the "patterns of thought and conventions of style" for the period. Romantic poet William Wordsworth was the most affected by her works. He said of Smith in the 1830s that she was "a lady to whom English verse is under greater obligations than are likely to be either acknowledged or remembered". By the second half of the nineteenth century, however, Smith was largely forgotten.
    Show book