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Coconut & Sambal - Recipes from my Indonesian Kitchen - cover

Coconut & Sambal - Recipes from my Indonesian Kitchen

Lara Lee

Publisher: Bloomsbury UK

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Summary

---Selected by the New York Times as one of the best cookbooks of 2020--- 
 
Be transported to the bountiful islands of Indonesia by this collection of fragrant, colourful and mouth-watering recipes. 
 
'An exciting and panoramic selection of dishes and snacks' – Fuchsia Dunlop, author of The Food of Sichuan 
  
Coconut & Sambal reveals the secrets behind authentic Indonesian cookery. With more than 80 traditional and vibrant recipes that have been passed down through the generations, you will discover dishes such as Nasi goreng, Beef rendang, Chilli prawn satay and Pandan cake, alongside a variety of recipes for sambals: fragrant, spicy relishes that are undoubtedly the heart and soul of every meal. 
  
Lara uses simple techniques and easily accessible ingredients throughout Coconut and Sambal, interweaving the recipes with beguiling tales of island life and gorgeous travel photography that shines a light on the magnificent, little-known cuisine of Indonesia. 
  
What are you waiting for? Travel the beautiful islands of Indonesia and taste the different regions through these recipes. 
 
'Start with Lara's fragrant chicken soup, do lots of exploring on the way whilst dousing everything with spoonfuls of sambal, and end with her coconut and pandan sponge cake' – Yotam Ottolenghi, author of SIMPLE 
 
'An incredibly delicious Indonesian meal on your table every time' – Jeremy Pang, chef and founder of School of Wok

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