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Love Looks Pretty on You - cover

Love Looks Pretty on You

Lang Leav

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

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Summary

Filled with wisdom and encouragement, every single page is a testament to the power of words, and the impact they can have on the relationships you build with others. And most importantly, the one you have with yourself.Lang Leav captures the intricacies of emotions like few others can. It's no wonder she has been recognized as a major influencer of the modern poetry movement and her writing has inspired a whole new generation of poets to pick up a pen.Love Looks Pretty on You is truly the must-have book for poetry lovers all over the world.

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