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Nightmares - A New Decade of Modern Horror - cover

Nightmares - A New Decade of Modern Horror

Richard Kadrey, Caitl?n Kiernan, Garth Nix, Gene Wolfe, Margo Lanagan, Laird Barron

Publisher: Tachyon Publications

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Summary

Unlucky thieves invade a house where Home Alone seems like a playground romp. An antique bookseller and a mob enforcer join forces to retrieve the Atlas of Hell. Postapocalyptic survivors cannot decide which is worse: demon women haunting the skies or maddened extremists patrolling the earth.In this chilling twenty-first-century companion to the cult classic Darkness: Two Decades of Modern Horror, Ellen Datlow again proves herself the most masterful editor of the genre. She has mined the breadth and depth of ten years of terror, collecting superlative works of established masters and scene-stealing newcomers alike.

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