Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Kwaidan - Stories and Studies of Strange Things - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have more than 1 million other books you can enjoy!

Kwaidan - Stories and Studies of Strange Things

Lafcadio Hearn

Publisher: Open Road Media

  • 2
  • 3
  • 0

Summary

A classic book of ghost stories from one of the world’s leading nineteenth-century writers, the author of In Ghostly Japan and Japanese Fairy Tales.   Published just months before Lafcadio Hearn’s death in 1904, Kwaidan features several stories and a brief nonfiction study on insects: butterflies, mosquitoes, and ants. The tales included are reworkings of both written and oral Japanese traditions, including folk tales, legends, and superstitions.   “At age thirty-nine, Hearn travelled on a magazine assignment to Japan, and never came back. At a moment when that country, under Emperor Meiji, was weathering the shock and upheaval of forced economic modernization, Hearn fell deeply in love with the nation’s past. He wrote fourteen books on all manner of Japanese subjects but was especially infatuated with the customs and culture preserved in Japanese folktales—particularly the ghost-story genre known as kaidan. . . . He died in 1904, and, by the time his ‘Japanese tales’ were translated into Japanese, in the nineteen-twenties, the country’s transformation was so complete that Hearn was hailed as a kind of guardian of tradition; his kaidan collections are still part of the curriculum in many Japanese schools.” —The New Yorker

Other books that might interest you

  • ARM and the Woman - cover

    ARM and the Woman

    Laura Lippman

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    New York Times bestselling author Laura Lippman has been hailed as one of the best crime fiction writers in America today, winning virtually every major award in the genre. The author of the enormously popular series featuring Baltimore P.I. Tess Monaghan as well as three critically lauded stand-alone novels, Lippman now turns her attention to short stories-and reveals another level of mastery. 
    Lippman sets many of the stories in this sterling anthology, Hardly Knew Her, in familiar territory: her beloved Baltimore, from downtown to its affluent suburbs, where successful businessmen go to shocking lengths to protect what they have or ruthlessly expand their holdings, while dissatisfied wives find murderous ways to escape their lives. But Lippman is also unafraid to travel-to New Orleans, to an unnamed southwestern city, and even to Dublin, the backdrop for the lethal clash of two not-so-innocents abroad. Tess Monaghan is here, in two stories and a profile, aligning herself with various underdogs. And in her extraordinary, never-before-published novella, Scratch a Woman, Lippman takes us deep into the private world of a high-priced call girl/madam and devoted soccer mom, exploring the mystery of what may, in fact, be written in the blood. 
    Each of these ingenious tales is a gem-sometimes poignant, sometimes humorous, always filled with delightfully unanticipated twists and reversals. For people who have yet to read Lippman, get ready to experience the spellbinding power of "one of today's most pleasing storytellers, hailed for her keen psychological insights and her compelling characterizations," (San Diego Union-Tribune), who has "invigorated the crime fiction arena with smart, innovative, and exciting work" (George Pelecanos). As for longtime devotees of her multiple award-winning novels, you'll discover that you hardly know her.
    Show book
  • The Giant who Had No Heart - cover

    The Giant who Had No Heart

    Peter Christen Asbjörnsen

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Peter Christen Asbjørnsen (1812-1885) was a Norwegian writer, scholar and collector of traditional folktales. 
    The Giant Who Had No Heart is one of the tales he collected. It tells the story of a kind prince who sets off to rescue his brothers and their sweethearts, who have been turned to stone by a cruel giant. With the help of a raven, a salmon, a wolf and a very clever princess, he is finally able to rescue his brothers and their brides and win the princess for himself.
    Show book
  • The Green God - cover

    The Green God

    L. Ron Hubbard, Various Various

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Private detective Sam Spade nearly died, several times over, chasing The Maltese Falcon. But what Spade faced in pursuit of the black bird was child’s play compared to what Lieutenant Bill Mahone of Naval Intelligence endures when he sets out to find The Green God.He’s tortured with knives, threatened with a slow, painful death, and buried alive. And then things get really nasty. The entire Chinese city of Tientsin is under siege from within—the streets filled with rioting, arson, mass looting, and murder. And all because the city’s sacred idol—The Green God—has gone missing. Mahone’s convinced he knows who stole the deity of jade, diamonds, and pearls. To retrieve it, though, he’ll have to go undercover and underground. But he’s walking a razor’s edge - between worship and warfare, between a touch of heaven and a taste of bloody hell.As a young man, Hubbard visited Manchuria, where his closest friend headed up British intelligence in northern China. Hubbard gained a unique insight into the intelligence operations and spy-craft in the region, as well as the criminal trade in sacred objects. It was on this experience that he based "The Green God", which was his first professional sale, published in February, 1934—the beginning of a very remarkable and prolific writing career.Also includes the adventure Five Mex for a Million, in which an American Army captain, falsely accused of murder, finds himself taking on the Chinese government, a powerful Russian general, and a mysterious, unexpected passenger.
    Show book
  • Hermit of ---- Street - cover

    Hermit of ---- Street

    Anna Katharine Green

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Delight Hunter spends her days looking out of her window at her handsome but very mysterious and reclusive  next door neighbor. She walks straight into a mystery when one day a fire starts in one of the upper rooms of his house and she dashes over to warn him, only to have him lock her in with instructions to let no one else in. Why is he so insistent that no one come in? What secrets are hidden within the walls of this house?  - Summary by Laura Victoria
    Show book
  • Berlin Noir - cover

    Berlin Noir

    Zoë Beck, Ulrich Woelk

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “A city with a rich noir past looks beyond its history to an equally unsettling present” in this anthology of original noir fiction set in Berlin (Kirkus Reviews).   From Christopher Isherwood to Philip Kerr, the long and rich tradition of noir fiction set in Berlin can make the genre a daunting challenge for contemporary German authors. But rather than retread the well-worn ground of interwar and Cold War history, the authors represented in Berlin Noir set their tales in the 21st century: a time of immigration, internet cafes, and AirBnB. Here you will find stories of moneyed libertines in upscale Grunewald, class tensions in the traditionally working-class district of Wedding, a marauding killer in Schöneberg, and more unrest in the German Capital.  Berlin Noir features brand-new stories by Zoë Beck, Ulrich Woelk, Susanne Saygin, Robert Rescue, Johannes Groschupf, Ute Cohen, Katja Bohnet, Matthias Wittekindt, Kai Hensel, Miron Zownir, Max Annas, Michael Wuliger, and Rob Alef. Translated from German by Lucy Jones.
    Show book
  • Who killed Charlie Winpole? - cover

    Who killed Charlie Winpole?

    Ernest Bramah

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Ernest Bramah (1868-1942) was an English author of 21 novels and numerous short stories and features. His humorous works have been ranked with Jerome K. Jerome and W. W. Jacobs, his detective stories with Conan Doyle, his politico-science fiction with H. G. Wells, and his supernatural stories with Algernon Blackwood.In his stories of detection, Bramah hit on the idea of a blind detective, Max Carrados, whose triumphs are all the more amazing because of his disability.In Who Killed Charlie Winpole?, Max Carrados investigates what initially appears to be a tragic case of a teenage boy who is accidentally poisoned by a toxic toadstool mistaken for an edible mushroom. Within a few days, the boy's uncle has been arrested and charged with murder. But Carrados is not satisfied by this explanation either and embarks on a highly irregular kind of investigation.
    Show book