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Closing Time - The True Story of the "Looking for Mr Goodbar" Murder - cover

Closing Time - The True Story of the "Looking for Mr Goodbar" Murder

Lacey Fosburgh

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

The real story behind the murder of a Manhattan schoolteacher that became a symbol of the dangers of casual sex: “A first-rate achievement” (Truman Capote). In 1973, Roseann Quinn, an Irish-Catholic teacher at a school for deaf children, was killed in New York City after bringing a man home to her apartment from an Upper West Side pub. The crime would not only make headlines, but would soon be fictionalized in the #1 New York Times–bestselling novel Looking for Mr. Goodbar and adapted into a film of the same name, starring Diane Keaton and Richard Gere. The case evolved a cultural phenomenon, sparking debates about the sexual revolution and the perils of the “pickup scene” at what were popularly known as singles bars.   In this groundbreaking, inventive true crime tale, the New York Times reporter first assigned to the story offers “a meticulous, investigative account of the so-called Goodbar killing” (Los Angeles Times). Using a dramatization technique in which she gives the victim a different name, Lacey Fosburgh veers between the chilling, suspenseful personal interactions leading up to the brutal stabbing and the gritty facts of the aftermath, including the NYPD investigation and the arrest of John Wayne Wilson.   The result is a must-read that earned an Edgar Award nomination for Best Fact Crime, and a classic of the genre that Men’s Journal described as “more riveting, and more tragic, than the Judith Rossner novel—and the 1977 movie Looking for Mr. Goodbar.” In the words of the New York Times, “Fosburgh writes with compassion of these sick and shattered lives.”  

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