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The Rubaiyat - cover

The Rubaiyat

Khayyam Omar

Publisher: Interactive Media

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Summary

The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam is one of the best known examples of Persian poetry. Although commercially unsuccessful at first, FitzGerald's work was popularised from 1861 onward by Whitley Stokes, and the work came to be greatly admired by the Pre-Raphaelites in England.

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