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Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam Rendered into English Verse - cover

Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam Rendered into English Verse

Khayyam Omar

Translator Edward FitzGerald

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám is the name Edward FitzGerald gave to his translation from Persian to English of a selection of quatrains attributed to Omar Khayyam, also known as "the Astronomer-Poet of Persia." This book had a great impact on the literary developments in Europe. By the 1880s, it was extremely popular throughout the English-speaking world. After the publication, numerous "Omar Khayyam clubs" were formed, and there was a "fin de siècle cult of the Rubaiyat."
Available since: 11/22/2019.
Print length: 1137 pages.

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