Do you want to read 1 year without limits?
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
The Art of Losing - Poems of Grief and Healing - cover

The Art of Losing - Poems of Grief and Healing

Kevin Young

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA

  • 1
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

The Art of Losing is the first anthology of its kind, delivering poetry with a purpose. Editor Kevin Young has introduced and selected 150 devastatingly beautiful poems that embrace the pain and heartbreak of mourning. Divided into five sections (Reckoning, Remembrance, Rituals, Recovery, and Redemption), with poems by some of our most beloved poets as well as the best of the current generation of poets, The Art of Losing is the ideal gift for a loved one in a time of need and for use by therapists, ministers, rabbis, and palliative care workers who tend to those who are experiencing loss.  
 
Among the poets included: Elizabeth Alexander, W. H. Auden, Amy Clampitt, Billy Collins, Emily Dickinson, Louise Gluck, Ted Hughes, Galway Kinnell, Kenneth Koch, Philip Larkin, Li-Young Lee, Philip Levine, Marianne Moore, Sharon Olds, Mary Oliver, Robert Pinsky, Adrienne Rich, Theodore Roethke, Anne Sexton, Wallace Stevens, Dylan Thomas, Derek Walcott, and James Wright.

Who read this book also read:

  • Somewhere Between Heaven and Hell - cover

    Somewhere Between Heaven and Hell

    Johnathan Bishop

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Where does happiness live? 
    
    Is it in a tree? 
    Is it in the sea? 
    Is it by the mall? 
    Is it found in Fall? 
    
    Where does happiness live? 
    
    Is it in a book? 
    Is it by a brook? 
    Is it in the food? 
    Is it the game Snood? 
    
    Where does happiness live, 
    and why can’t I find it?
    Show book
  • Address - cover

    Address

    Elizabeth Wills

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Winner of the Laurence L. & Thomas Winship / PEN New England Award (2012)Address draws us into visible and invisible architectures, into acts of intimate and public address. These poems are concentrated, polyvocal, and sharply attentive to acts of representation; they take personally their politics and in the process reveal something about the way civic structures inhabit the imagination. Poisonous plants, witches, anthems, bees—beneath their surface, we glimpse the fragility of our founding, republican aspirations and witness a disintegrating landscape artfully transformed. If a poem can serve as a kind of astrolabe, measuring distances both cosmic and immediate, temporal and physical, it does so by imaginative, nonlinear means. Here, past and present engage in acts of mutual interrogation and critique, and within this dynamic Willis’s poetry is at once complexly authoritative and searching: “so begins our legislation.” Check for the online reader’s companion at http://address.site.wesleyan.edu.
    Show book
  • The Tale Of Archais - cover

    The Tale Of Archais

    Aleister Crowley

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    This early work of poetry, by Aleister Crowley, was originally published in 1898. Born in Royal Leamington Spa, England in 1875, Crowley was raised by Christian fundamentalist parents. He attended Trinity College at Cambridge University, but left before graduating. After leaving the college, he devoted his time to studying the occult, and travelled extensively throughout the world in persuit of its secret knowledge. He went on to become a prolific writer, producing essays, prose and poetry on a wide range of subjects. To this day he remains a highly influential figure, both in occult circles and popular culture. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900's and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions.
    Show book
  • Bagay Bagay - Contemporary Philippine Poetry - cover

    Bagay Bagay - Contemporary...

    Teo T. Antonio

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Before we achieve big things in life, we have to start small first. However, sometimes, we tend to forget these little things. We tend to forget their importance. Thus, we wonder why our dreams are not fulfilled.
     
    This contemporary poetry collection by Teo T. Antonio delves deeper into the small things that matter and how they significantly impact our lives in some way.
    Show book
  • Beautiful Chaos - cover

    Beautiful Chaos

    Robert M. Drake

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    Volume 3 of Robert M. Drakes entries. This book employs the comparative method to understand societal collapses to which environmental problems contribute to the common youth and society as a whole. In his writing, Robert M. Drake hauntingly describes the issues we are all facing today. We all are broken and broken is its own kind of beautiful.
    Show book
  • Angina Days - Selected Poems - cover

    Angina Days - Selected Poems

    Günter Eich

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    This is the most comprehensive English translation of the work of Günter Eich, one of the greatest postwar German poets. The author of the POW poem "Inventory," among one of the most famous lyrics in the German language, Eich was rivaled only by Paul Celan as the leading poet in the generation after Gottfried Benn and Bertolt Brecht. Expertly translated and introduced by Michael Hofmann, this collection gathers eighty poems, many drawn from Eich's later work and most of them translated here for the first time. The volume also includes the original German texts on facing pages.
      
     As an early member of "Gruppe 47" (from which Günter Grass and Heinrich Böll later shot to prominence), Eich (1907-72) was at the vanguard of an effort to restore German as a language for poetry after the vitriol, propaganda, and lies of the Third Reich. Short and clear, these are timeless poems in which the ominousness of fairy tales meets the delicacy and suggestiveness of Far Eastern poetry. In his late poems, he writes frequently, movingly, and often wryly of infirmity and illness. "To my mind," Hofmann writes, "there's something in Eich of Paul Klee's pictures: both are homemade, modest in scale, immediately delightful, inventive, cogent."
      
     Unjustly neglected in English, Eich finds his ideal translator here.
    Show book