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The boy who wanted to wear a dress - cover

The boy who wanted to wear a dress

Kelsy Quiroz Sánchez

Publisher: Babidi-bú

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Summary

When little Ramón told his mother that he wanted to wear a dress, like his sister usually wore, his parents began to deal with the dilemma of whether letting him wear a dress or not. Ramon's family start a journey full of emotions in order to understand his son, his needs and his personality. This will allow them to get to know Ramoncito better as a person and to cherish his singularities.
IMPLICIT VALUES:
This story aims to teach children and adults about equality and respecting different personalities. As well as understanding the importance of embracing diversity in our families and communities.

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