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Mother of Millennials - A guide to understanding and embracing modern values - cover

Mother of Millennials - A guide to understanding and embracing modern values

Kathryn Mortimer, Harriet Mortimer, Sally Mortimer

Publisher: Mother of Millennials

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Summary

Baby Boomers, Generation X, Millennials. Can they ever really understand each other? Probably not, but Mother of Millennials is a great place to start.
 
The book provides a fascinating cross-generational look at life through the eyes of one mother and her two Millennial daughters. It explores how attitudes towards important themes have changed over the last half a century; themes such mental illness, the environment, veganism, LGBT rights, equality, corporate responsibility and many others.
 
The authors reach the inescapable conclusion that, far from being the lazy, entitled narcissists they are often portrayed as, Millennials are in fact bringing about a kinder, caring more inclusive world.
 
Whatever your age, you’re sure to find something of interest.
 
If you’re a parent (or indeed any older relative) of a Millennial, you’ll find the book a useful guide to explaining their world.
 
If you’re living in the shadow of mental illness, Sally’s painfully honest story may help you discover how to find rewarding work, happiness, and purpose in life.
 
If you’re a Millennial stuck in unfulfilling employment, Harriet’s story may provide the inspiration you need to change your path.

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