Subscribe and enjoy more than 1 million books
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced 7236434c7af12f85357591f712aa5cce47c3d377e8addfc98f989c55a4ef4ca5
Let Them Eat Chaos - cover

Let Them Eat Chaos

Kate Tempest

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Kate Tempest's powerful new narrative poem--set to music on her album of the same title--illuminates the lives of a single city street, creating an electric, humming human symphony. 
 
Let Them Eat Chaos, Kate Tempest's new long poem written for live performance and heard on the album release of the same name, is both a powerful sermon and a moving play for voices. Seven neighbors inhabit the same London street, but are all unknown to each other. The clock freezes in the small hours, and one by one we see directly into their lives: lives that are damaged, disenfranchised, lonely, broken, addicted, and all, apparently, without hope. Then a great storm breaks over London, and brings them out into the night to face each other--and their own last chance to connect.  
Tempest argues that our alienation from one another has bred a terrible indifference to our own fate, but she counters this with a plea to challenge the forces of greed which have conspired to divide us, and mend the broken home of our own planet while we still have time. Let Them Eat Chaos is a cri de cœur and a call to action, and, both on the page and in Tempest's electric performance, one of the most powerful poetic statements of the year.

Other books that might interest you

  • Love and Tai Chi - cover

    Love and Tai Chi

    Karen Glotzer

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The practice of tai chi is an embodiment of poetry, with its peaceful, balanced forms. Karen Glotzer, who is both a poet and a tai chi instructor, compares it to moving through gentle water, lifting off  the ground like a bird in flight, or standing like a tree with the wind gently blowing through its leaves.
    
    Through poetry, Love and Tai Chi relates the philosophy of tai chi to many different aspects of human existence. It provides simple explanations about the multiple benefits of the art, one that few Westerners are familiar with, despite the fact that it is lauded by Harvard Medical School for its meditative and health aspects. Glotzer also applies the yin and yang theory of opposites upon which tai chi is based toward a variety of subjects. These verses consider romantic love, animals, nature, life, death, and friendship, all through the lens of tai chi.
    
    This collection of poetry seeks to express in verse the feelings experienced in tai chi—what it feels like to walk upon clouds, move like water, take root like a tree, or fly like a crane.
    Show book
  • Planting Gardens in Graves - cover

    Planting Gardens in Graves

    r.h. Sin

    • 7
    • 75
    • 0
    r.h. Sin returns with a force in Planting Gardens in Graves: a powerful collection of poetry that hones in on the themes dearest to his readers. This original volume celebrates connection, mourns heartbreak, and above all, empowers its readers to seek the love they deserve.
    Show book
  • Infinite Riches: How to Create Money In Abundance - cover

    Infinite Riches: How to Create...

    Dr. Michael J. Duckett

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Somewhere, somehow a lie was presented and accepted by millions of people. This one falsehood has negatively affected more people than any other thought in history.
    Clergy, parents, governments, and teachers wrote and spoke negatively of this misunderstood topic and the general public believed it to be true.
    What is this lie? Wealth is something other than great!
    There are so many sayings people have created to support their poverty and feel comfortable with the fact of having nothing. Have you ever heard any of these?
    Money is the root of all evil. I believe that people who say money is the root of all evil just flat out don’t have any.
    Show book
  • She Felt Like Feeling Nothing - cover

    She Felt Like Feeling Nothing

    r.h. Sin

    • 8
    • 173
    • 0
    There are moments when the heart no longer wishes to feel because everything it's felt up until then has brought it nothing but anguish. In She Felt Like Feeling Nothing, r.h. Sin pursues themes of self-discovery and retrospection. With this book, the poet intends to create a safe space where women can rest their weary hearts and focus on themselves.
    Show book
  • Homecoming - cover

    Homecoming

    Heather Inc. Justesen

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Alanna is surprised by the return of her step-brother and former lover, Kyle, when he shows up to work at the newspaper she writes for as the new head photographer. Unbeknownst to him, they have a daughter from the night before they last saw each other eight years previous. Can they forgive each other and rekindle the trust and love they once shared?
    Show book
  • The Poetry of May Sarton Volume One - Letters from Maine Inner Landscape and Halfway to Silence - cover

    The Poetry of May Sarton Volume...

    May Sarton

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Three celebrated volumes of verse from a feminist icon, poet, and author of the groundbreaking novel Mrs. Stevens Hears the Mermaids Singing.  Letters from Maine: A rugged coastline provides a stark background for Sarton’s images of a tragically brief love. With vulnerability and emotional depth, she explores the willingness to devote everything to a new love, as well as the despair at the memory of what is left over when it fades.  Inner Landscape: This collection of May Sarton’s poems displays her inimitable mix of stately verse and depth of feeling that lurks beneath every line, creating a tantalizing, magnetically charged distance between reader and poet.  Halfway to Silence: After decades of writing flowing lyric verse, May Sarton’s style turned to short, vibrant bursts of poetry. These condensed poems are rife with exuberant impressions of nature and of love, including two of her most acclaimed works, “Old Lovers at the Ballet” and “Of the Muse.”   Recognized as a true pioneer in lesbian literature, “Sarton’s poems enter and illuminate every natural corner of our lives. . . . So strong in their faith and in their positive response to the human condition that they will outlast much of the fashionable, cynical poetry of our ear” (James Martin).  
    Show book