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Social Distancing Games - Teach - Love - Inspire bel activity + games booklets - cover

Social Distancing Games - Teach - Love - Inspire bel activity + games booklets

Karin Schweizer, Beate Baylie

Publisher: bel Verlag

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Summary

Welcome to bel's book of social distancing games!
Let's be honest – coronavirus and its consequences have had a huge impact on everybody and all aspects of our lives. It has not been easy, but teachers everywhere have risen to the challenge. Classes have been taking place online, via telephone conferences, and slowly but surely, back in the classroom. bel always tries to meet the needs of both students and teachers.
On this occasion – particularly mindful that fun is more important than ever – we have put together a compendium of games that can be played by classes whilst keeping to the social distancing guidelines and rules.
Teachers and students alike can have fun, play with the English language, socialise, learn, and not be defeated by something that is 400 times smaller than the thickness of a single human hair. The games generally require little in the way of preparation. Some need a board or flipchart, some need pen and paper, and some need nothing at all. None of the games are reliant on the students interacting closely with each other. Everybody can keep their distance.
It only remains for us to say: have fun, be safe, and stay healthy!
Available since: 01/15/2021.
Print length: 30 pages.

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