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Bats Sing Mice Giggle - The Surprising Science of Animals' Inner Lives - cover

Bats Sing Mice Giggle - The Surprising Science of Animals' Inner Lives

Karen Shanor, Jagmeet Kanwal

Publisher: Icon Books

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Summary

"Bats Sing, Mice Giggle" tracks many years of research by hundreds of scientists that reveals how wild animals, as well as pets, have inner, secret lives of which until recently - although many animal lovers will have instinctively believed it - we have had little proof. The authors show how animal 'friends' stay in touch, and how they warn and help each other in times of danger; how some animals problem-solve as or in some instances even more effectively than humans - and how they regulate, create, and entertain themselves and others. They show how animals express grief and reverence in ways we never thought possible. From the sleep patterns of some owls, birds and horses, as well as porpoises, who go to sleep in only one half of their brains at a time; to how schools of electric fish give off complex signals of one frequency to communicate with their mates and another frequency to locate their prey, and how Polar bears tune into quantum 'radio stations' to sense prey as far away as ten miles and under the snow, "Bats Sing, Mice Giggle" provides an unparalleled insight into animals' secret lives.

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