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Feed the Resistance - Recipes + Ideas for Getting Involved - cover

Feed the Resistance - Recipes + Ideas for Getting Involved

Julia Turshen

Publisher: Chronicle Books LLC

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Summary

From favorite cookbook author Julia Turshen comes this practical and inspiring handbook for political activism—with recipes. As the millions who marched in January 2017 demonstrated, activism is the new normal. When people search for ways to resist injustice and express support for civil rights, environmental protections, and more, they begin by gathering around the table to talk and plan. These dishes foster community and provide sustenance for the mind and soul, including a dozen  of the healthy, affordable recipes Turshen is known for, plus over 15 more  recipes from a diverse range of celebrated chefs. With stimulating lists, extensive resources, and essays from activists in the worlds of food, politics, and social causes, Feed the Resistance is a must have handbook for anyone hoping to make a difference.

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