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Kevät ja takatalvi - cover

Kevät ja takatalvi

Juhani Aho

Publisher: Publisher s19595

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Summary

Kevään ja takatalven suuri teema - kansallisuusaatteen ja herännäisyyden, fennomanian ja pietismin yhteenliittyminen suomalaiseksi kulttuuriksi - on Antero Hagmanin suuri haave, josta hän joutuu luopumaan illuusioiden kadotessa yksi toisensa jälkeen.

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