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Murder in Pleasanton - Tina Faelz and the Search for Justice - cover

Murder in Pleasanton - Tina Faelz and the Search for Justice

Joshua Suchon

Publisher: The History Press

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Summary

A journalist digs into the California cold case of a teenager murdered in his hometown in this disturbing true crime account.    In April 1984, fourteen-year-old Foothill High freshman Tina Faelz took a shortcut on her walk home. About an hour later, she was found in a ditch, brutally stabbed to death. The murder shook the quiet East Bay suburb of Pleasanton and left investigators baffled.   With no witnesses or leads, the case went cold and remained so for nearly thirty years. Then the investigation finally got a break in 2011. Improved forensics recovered DNA from a drop of blood found at the scene matching Tina’s classmate, Steven Carlson.   Through dusty police files, personal interviews, letters and firsthand accounts, journalist Joshua Suchon revisits his childhood home to uncover the story of a shocking crime and the controversial sentencing that brought long-awaited answers to a tormented community.
Available since: 09/21/2015.
Print length: 195 pages.

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