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Letchworth Garden City Through Time - cover

Letchworth Garden City Through Time

Josh Tidy

Publisher: Amberley Publishing

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Summary

Letchworth Garden City was founded in Hertfordshire in 1903. It was the realisation of social reformer, Ebenezer Howard's dream of a new type of place, combining the best of town and country, where the surplus from the estate is reinvested for the benefit of its fortunate citizens.Over a century after its birth, as the images in this book clearly show, the world's first Garden City is a thriving town, testament to its radical origins.Drawing from thousands of original photographs in the archives at the Garden City Collection and photographs taken by the author, this book aims to share his passion for the history of this unique town.

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