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Taking Your Place at the Table - The Art of Refusing to Be an Outsider - cover

Taking Your Place at the Table - The Art of Refusing to Be an Outsider

Joseph JB Bensmihen

Publisher: Morgan James Publishing

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Summary

Taking Your Place at the Table helps people:
Get to the table—move from the outside to the inside
Use their insider status wisely once they get there
Leave the table gracefully when the time is right

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