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A Reader's Guide to Marx's Capital - cover

A Reader's Guide to Marx's Capital

Joseph Choonara

Publisher: Haymarket Books

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Summary

p>This book carefully guides the reader through each chapter of the first volume of Capital. It sets Marx’s arguments in context, and explains their relevance today, and it offers insights into Marx’s method, highlighting key concepts running through the book. It also offers pointers to wider works that can provide further illumination.

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