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50 Classic Christmas Stories Vol 3 (Golden Deer Classics) - cover

50 Classic Christmas Stories Vol 3 (Golden Deer Classics)

H. W. Collingwood, Golden Deer Classics, Hans Christian Andersen, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Hesba Stretton, John Masefield, John John, John Strange Winter, José María de Pereda, Julia Schayer, Juliana Horatia Ewing, Kate Douglas Wiggin, Katharine Lee Bates, Kenneth Grahame, Louisa May Alcott, Lucy Maud Montgomery, M.E.S., Margaret E. Sangster, Margery Williams, Peter Christen Asbjörnsen, Ralph Henry Barbour, Santa Claus, Robert Ervin Howard, Robert Frost, Robert Ingersoll, Robert Louis Stevenson, Rose Terry Cooke, Rudyard Kipling, S. Weir Mitchell, Willa Cather, William Dean Howells, William Henry Davies, William J. Locke

Publisher: Oregan Publishing

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Summary

CONTENTS

H. W. COLLINGWOOD
1. Indian Pete's Christmas Gift

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN
2. The Fir-Tree

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN
3. The Last Dream of the Old Oak Tree

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN
4. The Little Match Girl

HARRIET BEECHER STOWE
5. Betty's Bright Idea

HARRIET BEECHER STOWE
6. Christmas In Poganuc

HARRIET BEECHER STOWE
7. Christmas; or, The Good Fairy

HARRIET BEECHER STOWE
8. The First Christmas of New England

HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW
9. Christmas Bells

HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW
10. The Three Kings

HESBA STRETTON
11. The Ghost in the Clock Room

JOHN MASEFIELD
12. Christmas

JOHN MILTON
13. On the Morning of Christ's Nativity

JOHN STRANGE WINTER
14. A Christmas Fairy

JOSÉ MARÍA DE PEREDA
15. A Christmas Eve in Spain

JULIA SCHAYER
16. Angela's Christmas

JULIANA HORATIA EWING
17. The Peace Egg

KATE DOUGLAS WIGGIN
18. The Birds' Christmas Carol

KATE DOUGLAS WIGGIN
19. The Romance of a Christmas Card

KATHARINE LEE BATES
20. Goody Santa Claus on a Sleigh Ride

KENNETH GRAHAME
21. Carol

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT
22. A Christmas Dream, and How It Came to Be True

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT
23. A Country Christmas

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT
24. A Song for a Christmas Tree

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT
25. Cousin Tribulation's Story

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT
26. Tilly's Christmas

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT
27. What the Bell Saw and Said

LUCY MAUD MONTGOMERY
28. A Christmas Inspiration

LUCY MAUD MONTGOMERY
29. Christmas at Red Butte

LUCY MAUD MONTGOMERY
30. Uncle Richard's New Year Dinner

M.E.S.
31. Christmas

MARGARET E. SANGSTER
32. The Christmas Babe

MARGERY WILLIAMS
33. The Velveteen Rabbit

PETER CHRISTEN ASBJORNSEN
34. Round the Yule-Log: Christmas in Norway

RALPH HENRY BARBOUR
35. A College Santa Claus

ROBERT ERVIN HOWARD
36. " Golden Hope " Christmas

ROBERT FROST
37. Christmas Trees

ROBERT INGERSOLL
38. What I Want for Christmas

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON
39. Markheim

ROSE TERRY COOKE
40. Christmas

RUDYARD KIPLING
41. Christmas in India

S. WEIR MITCHELL
42. Mr. Kris Kringle

WILLA CATHER
43. A Burglar's Christmas

WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS
44. Christmas Every Day

WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS
45. The Night Before Christmas

WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS
46. The Pony Engine and the Pacific Express

WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS
47. The Pumpkin-Glory

WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS
48. Turkeys Turning The Tables

WILLIAM HENRY DAVIES
49. Christmas

WILLIAM J. LOCKE
50. A Christmas Mystery
Available since: 11/24/2018.

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