Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Other Desert Cities - A Play - cover

Other Desert Cities - A Play

Jon Robin Baitz

Publisher: Grove Press

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

A political family confronts its dark history in this Pulitzer Prize-finalist play “with gleaming dialogue [and] tantalizing hints of a dangerous mystery” (Ben Brantley, The New York Times).  Winner of the Outer Critics Circle Award for Outstanding New Off-Broadway Play    Brooke Wyeth hasn’t been home to visit her parents in years. But now she’s back in Palm Springs for Christmas, and she has a startling announcement to make. Brooke is about to publish a detailed and intimate family memoir—one that will open a wound her politically prominent parents don’t want reopened.   First appearing on Broadway in a hit production starring Stacy Keach and Stockard Channing, Other Desert Cities “examine[s] the fractiousness of American politics through the prism of one family” (David Rooney, Hollywood Reporter).  

Other books that might interest you

  • The Hardest Lessons - A monologue and a duet reflecting on the realities of school life - cover

    The Hardest Lessons - A...

    Kelvin Bueckert

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The Hardest Lesson 
    Description:- A student about to end his life encounters a teacher about to end his career. Their relationship quickly builds to an explosive climax of choices...Yet, in the end, they find that they have both learned a valuable lesson. Although, if they were honest with themselves, they would both have to admit that it was the hardest lesson that they have ever learned... 
    Four Seasons 
    Description:-A journey through four seasons of school life...In the beginning, we see our main character creating chaos in Elementary School, as time passes, we hear about their deeply personal struggles during High School. At the end of High School, our hero delivers a moving speech on Graduation Day showing just how much they have grown up. Finally, at the end of the play, we hear our narrator as an old man, reflecting on what they have learned from their career in education.
    Show book
  • Master of the Night-Demons - cover

    Master of the Night-Demons

    Grant Stockbridge

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Just as Adolph Hitler brutally slaughtered his opponents, so did Asmodeus, Master of the Night-Demons, crush New York’s police force and lay down his hideous ultimatum to the city: “Surrender... or die!” Could one man — Richard Wentworth — with only his pitifully few loyal allies, and the Spider’s sinister garb, stem this monstrous Blitzkrieg of crime! How can millionaire criminologist Richard Wentworth, secretly the Spider, battle such an appalling menace and survive to tell the tale? Harried on all sides, the target of Underworld assassins and police arrest warrants alike, the Spider gives no quarter as he races to bring another vicious supercriminal to justice. Master of the Night-Demons is torn from the pages of the September, 1940 issue of The Spider magazine.
    Show book
  • One Hundred Verses from Old Japan - cover

    One Hundred Verses from Old Japan

    Teika no Fujiwara

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In 12th-13th century Japan there lived a man named Fujiwara no Teika (sometimes called Sadaie), a well-regarded poet in a society that prized poetry. At one point in his life he compiled the Ogura Hyakunin Isshu (often known simply as the Hyakunin Isshu), which means “A Hundred Poems by A Hundred Poets” (literally “A hundred people, one poem [each]”).    This collection of a hundred poems is known to almost all Japanese, and over the years it has been translated by many different people. One of the early translators of the collection was William Porter. His translation, first published in 1909, was titled “A Hundred Verses from Old Japan”.    (Summary by Kevin Steinbach)
    Show book
  • 100 More Great Indian Poems - cover

    100 More Great Indian Poems

    Abhay K.

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Just like 100 Great Indian Poems, 100 More Great Indian Poems brings forth the richness and diversity of poetry that exists in India's myriad languages and dialects. It also highlights the achievements of Indian poetry written in English by Indian poets at home as well as those in the diaspora and how they have turned English, once a foreign language, into their own. In these uniquely Indian poems there is abundance of light, irony, sensuousness and spirituality.
    Show book
  • W B Yeats: Poems - cover

    W B Yeats: Poems

    William Butler Yeats

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    This compelling collection spans Yeats's career: from the poems of his early years, which display his interest in Irish myths and his hopeless passion for Irish patriot Maud Gonne, to the soaring, majestic poems of his old age. Works of precision, economy and sensuous, lyrical beauty, they include "The Lake Isle of Innisfree", "The Wild Swans at Coole", "Byzantium", and "Leda and the Swan".A HighBridge Audio production.
    Show book
  • The Poetry of Amy Levy - cover

    The Poetry of Amy Levy

    Amy Levy

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Amy Levy was born in London, England in 1861, the second of seven in a fairly wealthy Anglo-Jewish family. The children read and participated in secular literary activities and became firmly integrated into Victorian life. 
     
    Her education was at Brighton High School, Brighton, before studies at Newnham College, Cambridge; she was the first Jewish student when she arrived in 1879, but left after four terms. 
     
    Amy’s writing career began early; her poem ‘Ida Grey’ appeared when she was only fourteen. Her acclaimed short stories ‘Cohen of Trinity’ and ‘Wise in Their Generation,’ were published by Oscar Wilde in his magazine ‘Women's World’. 
     
    Her poetic writings reveal feminist concerns; ‘Xantippe and Other Verses’, from 1881 includes a poem in the voice of Socrates's wife. ‘A Minor Poet and Other Verse’ from 1884 comprises of dramatic monologues and lyric poems. 
     
    In 1886, Amy began a series of essays on Jewish culture and literature for the Jewish Chronicle, including ‘The Ghetto at Florence’, ‘The Jew in Fiction’, ‘Jewish Humour’ and ‘Jewish Children’. 
     
    That same year while travelling in Florence she met the writer Vernon Lee. It is generally assumed they fell in love and this inspired the poem ‘To Vernon Lee’. 
     
    Her first novel ‘Romance of a Shop’, written in 1888 is based on four sisters who experience the pleasures and hardships of running a London business during the 1880s. This was followed by Reuben Sachs (also 1888) and concerned with Jewish identity and mores in the England of her time and was somewhat controversial. 
    Her final book of poems, ‘A London Plane-Tree’ from 1889, shows the beginnings of the influence of French symbolism. 
     
    Despite many friendships and an active life, Amy suffered for many years with serious depressions and this, together with her growing deafness, led her to commit suicide by inhaling carbon monoxide on September 10th, 1889. She was 27.
    Show book