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America's Greatest Library - An Illustrated History of the Library of Congress - cover

America's Greatest Library - An Illustrated History of the Library of Congress

John Y. Cole

Publisher: GILES

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Summary

Packed with fascinating facts, compelling images, and little-known nuggets of information, this new go-to illustrated guide to the history of the Library of Congress will appeal to history buffs and general readers alike. It distils over two hundred years of history into an engaging read that makes a Washington icon relevant today.

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