Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
Breathe 02 - cover

Breathe 02

John Sheridan

Publisher: Markosia

  • 1
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

China the late 1700′s. High up in the mountains, in a poverty stricken village, lives a young girl. On a bright sunny day shes called back home to discover that her whole family have been slain in a vendetta attack. Could it be the local Bao Gang, known for their bullying antics, opium smuggling, and employed by a wealthy farmer to stop the village from rebelling — or someone closer to home? Reprinting in deluxe hard cover format, the smash-hit sold-out four issue mini series with an additional gallery of cover art by Kit Wallis.

Who read this book also read:

  • Music Law - How to Run Your Band's Business - cover

    Music Law - How to Run Your...

    Richard Stim

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    You're more likely to have a successful career in the music business if you can understand and negotiate music business contracts and copyrights. This best-selling book explains how to do that in plain English.
    
    
    
    This is the all-purpose music business book that explains how to find the right manager, buy, insure and maintain equipment, get gigs and get paid, tour on a budget, use samples, do covers legally, protect your copyright, trademark your band’s name, and sell your music.
    Show book
  • Playboy: Brunettes - cover

    Playboy: Brunettes

    James R. Petersen

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    From Playboy's classic archives comes a trilogy of mini volumes, each devoted to a certain hair color destined to quicken a man's pulse. Blonde? Brunette? Redhead? In the fifties, sixties, and seventies, it seemed like all the Playboy models, not just blondes, had more fun. Building sandcastles in the buff, romping on tiger skin rugs, or starting pillow fights, beauties of every tress are captured in these timeless color photographs. Playboy contributing editor James R. Petersen introduces each book with a heartfelt text, and witty quotes are sprinkled throughout. At once evocative and whimsical, this handsome collection is a perfect gift for a gentleman—whether he prefers a blonde, marries a brunette, or has always had a thing for a redhead.
    Show book
  • Francis Bacon in Your Blood - cover

    Francis Bacon in Your Blood

    Michael Peppiatt

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    In June of 1963, when Michael Peppiatt first met Francis Bacon, the former was a college boy at Cambridge, the latter already a famous painter, more than thirty years his senior. And yet, Peppiatt was welcomed into the volatile artist's world; Bacon, considered by many to be "mad, bad, and dangerous to know,†? proved himself a devoted friend and father figure, even amidst the drinking and gambling.   
      
    Though Peppiatt would later write perhaps the definitive biography of Bacon, his sharply drawn memoir has a different vigor,  revealing the artist at his most intimate and indiscreet, and his London and Paris milieus in all their seediness and splendor. Bacon is felt with immediacy, as Peppiatt draws from contemporary diaries and records of their time together, giving us the story of a friendship, and a new perspective on an artist of enduring fascination.
    Show book
  • The Man Who Sold the World - David Bowie and the 1970s - cover

    The Man Who Sold the World -...

    Peter Doggett

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Man Who Sold the World by Peter Doggett—author of the critically acclaimed Beatles biography, You Never Give Me Your Money—is a song-by-song chronicle of the evolution of David Bowie. 
    Focusing on the work and the life of one of the most groundbreaking figures in music and popular culture during the turbulent seventies, Bowie’s most productive and innovative period, The Man Who Sold the World is the book that serious rock music lovers have been waiting for. 
    By exploring David Bowie’s individual achievements and breakthroughs one-by-one, Doggett paints a fascinating portrait of the performer who paved the way for a host of fearless contemporary artists, from Radiohead to Lady Gaga.
    Show book
  • Make Money Online with Your Music - Creative Entrepreneurship Series - cover

    Make Money Online with Your...

    Andy McWain

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Leveraging New Technology and Online Platforms to Reach Your True Fans, Make Money Online, and Earn Extra Income as a Musician 
    How should I sell my music? Where can I distribute my recordings? How else can I make money as a musician? How can I find my true fans? Should I teach online? Should I write books? What platforms and websites in web 3.0 should a musician know about?  
    Do you want to know…How you can access your music, your musical experiences, and your knowledge of musical styles, gear, musicianship, and more to create additional revenue streams?What approach is useful when accessing new technologies, media, and outlets for your music?How to create content that develops passive income strategies for musicians and other creatives?What secret weapons musicians already possess that makes the web the perfect place to earn money?What ways you can expand and develop your online presence that can both simplify and also maximize your offline activities as a musician and creative person? What music fans can teach us about being better musicians? 
    On some level, perhaps we all want to just create for a living. Even if you’re not a composer or songwriter/lyricist who writes original music, you might just want to create superb performances and amazing recordings. Or you might simply want a fair and comfortable wage for your work and your playing — and for all the years of preparation and practice, and for your experience.  
    Unfortunately, this isn’t always possible. Musicians — of all backgrounds — too often struggle to survive… 
    Maybe it’s your region? Where you live there may not seem to be enough performance opportunities and music teaching gigs for your instrument, your particular style, your musical genre, for the given amount of musicians in that area.  
    So what can you do?  
    Should you just move to New York? Move to Los Angeles? Maybe Nashville, Chicago, Seattle, London, Paris, Berlin, Tokyo, Shanghai, or Buenos Aires? Perhaps. And it sounds like fun… But maybe you already live in one of those great places, and you still struggle to create a full, sustainable musical life. 
    Musicians in the Global Marketplace 
    Years ago, I attended a workshop given by the German avant-garde vibraphonist and composer Karl Berger where he said he followed this simple model of musician survival: with nearly 7 billion people in the world, he would be happy to find ways to get 5,000 people to give him $10 each year! 
    That's it -- simple math.  
    Sell them a recording, a concert ticket, a workshop, a book, anything… 
    Of course, once you can do this consistently and make that living wage of $50K, you're totally free to create your music and live your musical life any way that you choose. But how do you find those 5,000 people? How do you connect with them? How can you bring in diversified revenue streams that don’t require your fans, followers, listeners, and ‘clients’ to become over-saturated with relentless sales of your latest project? 
    Show book
  • Eric Rohmer - Interviews - cover

    Eric Rohmer - Interviews

    Fiona Handyside

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The 1969 film Ma Nuit chez Maud catapulted its shy academic film director Eric Rohmer (1920–2010) into the limelight, selling over a million tickets in France and earning a nomination for an Academy Award. Ma Nuit chez Maud remains his most famous film, the highlight of an impressive range of films examining the sexual, romantic, and artistic mores of contemporary France, the temptations of desire, the small joys of everyday life, and sometimes, the vicissitudes of history and politics. Yet Rohmer was almost fifty years old when Maud was released and had already had a career as the editor of Cahiers du Cinéma, a position he lost in a political takeover in 1963. The interviews in this book offer a range of insights into the theoretical, critical, and practical circumstances of Rohmer’s remarkably coherent body of films, but also allow Rohmer to act as his own critic, providing us with an array of readings concerning his interest in setting, season, color, and narrative. 
    Alongside the application of a theoretical rigor to his own films, Rohmer’s interviews also discuss directors as varied as Godard, Carné, Renoir, and Hitchcock, and the relations of film to painting, architecture, and music. This book reproduces little-known interviews, such as a debate Rohmer undertakes with Women and Film concerning feminism, alongside detailed discussions from Cahiers and Positif, many produced in English here for the first time.
    Show book