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The Pleasures of England - Lectures given in Oxford - cover

The Pleasures of England - Lectures given in Oxford

John Ruskin

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

"The Pleasures of England" by John Ruskin. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.
Available since: 12/12/2019.
Print length: 164 pages.

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