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The Harbours of England - cover

The Harbours of England

John Ruskin

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

'The Harbors of England' by John Ruskin is a forgotten gem with exquisite mezzotints by J.M.W. Turner. Despite being sought after by collectors, it has remained largely unknown to the general reader. Ruskin's essay on Turner's marine painting is a masterpiece in itself, supplemented here with additional facts about the book's genesis. This edition is a must-have for art connoisseurs, history buffs, and anyone who loves great writing and beautiful illustrations.
Available since: 12/04/2019.
Print length: 617 pages.

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