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Your Science Teacher is Wrong - cover

Your Science Teacher is Wrong

John Reed

Publisher: John Reed

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Summary

Around the mid 1500's mankind witnessed the birth of the Scientific Revolution. For the first time in history this new way of reasoning emerged from the fringes of society and became the dominant way of thinking. Human wisdom made radical leaps forward. 
Today we have entire institutions and wings of universities filled with PhDs devoted to the study of fields of science derived from facts resting on theories accepted during the 1500's and the following two centuries, There are billions worldwide who would never dream of questioning these same facts they were taught and have believed since early childhood. 
The advantage we have over the scientists of the 1500s is the availability of vastly superior measuring devices and analytical methods. Would the theories of old survive the level of scrutiny made available by today's technology? The Scientific Community has never permitted such testing. 
In this book I show how a common person can use high school math or readily available instruments to prove, and I mean prove with absolute certainty that many of our long held and never questioned scientific beliefs are in fact false.

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