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The Profession of Violence - The Rise and Fall of the Kray Twins - cover

The Profession of Violence - The Rise and Fall of the Kray Twins

John Pearson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Reader

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Summary

The classic, bestselling account of the infamous Kray twins, now a major film, LEGEND, starring Tom Hardy. 
 
Reggie and Ronald Kray ruled London's gangland during the 1960s with a ruthlessness and viciousness that shocks even now. Building an empire of organised crime such as nobody has done before or since, the brothers swindled, intimidated, terrorised, extorted and brutally murdered. John Pearson explores the strange relationship that bound the twins together, and charts their gruesome career to their downfall and imprisonment for life in 1969. 
 
Now expanded to include further extraordinary revelations, including the unusual alliance between the Kray twins and Lord Boothby – the Tory peer who won £40,000 in a libel settlement when he denied allegation of his association with the Krays – The Profession of Violence is a truly classic work. 
 
John Pearson is also the author of All the Money in the World (previously titled Painfully Rich),  now a major motion picture directed by Ridley Scott film and starring  Michelle Williams, Mark Wahlberg and Christopher Plumber (nominated for  the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor).

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