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Wilderness Essays - cover

Wilderness Essays

John Muir

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

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Summary

John Muir not only explored the American West but also fought for its preservation. His successes are evident in all the natural features that bear his name: forests, lakes, trails, and glaciers. Here collected are some of Muir's finest wilderness essays, ranging in subject matter from Alaska to Yellowstone, from Oregon to the High Sierra.

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