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Close to Home: Medicine Is the Best Laughter - A Close to Home Collection - cover

Close to Home: Medicine Is the Best Laughter - A Close to Home Collection

John MacPherson

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

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Summary

Cartoonist John McPherson’s comics may be close to home, but thank your lucky stars that his erratic characters haven’t made themselves too comfortable in your home. McPherson’s ode to everyday life is punctuated with the off-the-wall personalities who can turn any normal occurrence into something ridiculous. The only way to read these cartoons and their comical characters—from inept surgeons to cruel chiropractors—is to expect the unexpected. Close to Home debuted in 50 newspapers in 1992 after McPherson left his engineering job to become a full-time cartoonist, and today the comic strip runs in nearly 700 newspapers worldwide. His characters are regularly confronted with everyday dilemmas, including aggressive acupuncture and leaky laughing gas tanks, and their responses are always cleverly unpredictable. The situations are somehow both outlandish yet relatable, and anyone is sure to burst out in laughter at this original e-book collection of all of Close to Home’s boldest and best takes on everything medical.

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