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Introducing Wittgenstein - A Graphic Guide - cover

Introducing Wittgenstein - A Graphic Guide

John Heaton

Publisher: Icon Books

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Summary

This is a superlative graphic guide described as 'warm, witty and wise' by Jonathan Ree to an enigmatic master of twentieth-century philosophy.

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