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Jackal - The Complete Story of the Legendary Terrorist Carlos the Jackal - cover

Jackal - The Complete Story of the Legendary Terrorist Carlos the Jackal

John Follain

Publisher: Arcade Publishing

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Summary

The true story of the world’s most wanted international terrorist, who sold his services to everyone from Saddam Hussein to Fidel Castro. On the night of August 14, 1994, French counterespionage officers seized the world’s most wanted terrorist from a villa in the Sudan. His given name was Ilyich Ramírez Sánchez—but the world knew him as the terrorist “Carlos the Jackal.” For years he had murdered, bombed, and kidnapped his way to global notoriety, constantly evading capture thanks to powerful backers, renegade regimes, and the ineffectual efforts of Western secret services. But finally, after more than two decades on the run, the Jackal had been caged.Jackal is the chilling biography of a self-proclaimed “professional revolutionary,” ladies man, and cold-blooded killer. John Follain sets the story against the larger political picture of the time, exposing how the then-Soviet bloc and certain Arab regimes sponsored terrorist actions for their own ends during the Cold War. A cautionary tale of governments that fostered the image of an invincible criminal mastermind—who in reality was only a pawn in the relentless and deadly chess game between East and West—Jackal also provides fascinating insight into the mind of the world’s most wanted terrorist.

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