Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Jefferson and Hamilton - The Rivalry That Forged a Nation - cover

Jefferson and Hamilton - The Rivalry That Forged a Nation

John Ferling

Publisher: Bloomsbury Press

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

For readers of Ron Chernow's Alexander Hamilton, the spellbinding history of the epic rivalry that shaped our republic: Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and their competing visions for America. 
 
The decade of the 1790s has been called the “age of passion.” Fervor ran high as rival factions battled over the course of the new republic-each side convinced that the other's goals would betray the legacy of the Revolution so recently fought and so dearly won. All understood as well that what was at stake was not a moment's political advantage, but the future course of the American experiment in democracy. In this epochal debate, no two figures loomed larger than Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton. 
 
Both men were visionaries, but their visions of what the United States should be were diametrically opposed. Jefferson, a true revolutionary, believed passionately in individual liberty and a more egalitarian society, with a weak central government and greater powers for the states. Hamilton, a brilliant organizer and tactician, feared chaos and social disorder. He sought to build a powerful national government that could ensure the young nation's security and drive it toward economic greatness. 
 
Jefferson and Hamilton is the story of the fierce struggle-both public and, ultimately, bitterly personal-between these two titans. It ended only with the death of Hamilton in a pistol duel, felled by Aaron Burr, Jefferson's vice president. Their competing legacies, like the twin strands of DNA, continue to shape our country to this day. Their personalities, their passions, and their bold dreams for America leap from the page in this epic new work from one of our finest historians. 
 
From the award-winning author of Almost a Miracle and The Ascent of George Washington, this is the rare work of scholarship that offers us irresistible human drama even as it enriches our understanding of deep themes in our nation's history.

Other books that might interest you

  • The Donnellys: Powder Keg 1840–1880 - cover

    The Donnellys: Powder Keg 1840–1880

    John Little

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A violent family living in violent times.
    		 
    In the 1840s, the Donnelly family immigrates from Ireland to the British province of Canada. Almost immediately problems develop as the patriarch of the family is sent to the Kingston Penitentiary for manslaughter, leaving his wife to raise their eight children on her own.
    		 
    The children are raised in an incredibly violent community and cultivate a devoted loyalty to their mother and siblings, which often leads to problems with the law and those outside of the family.
    		 
    The tensions between the family and their community escalate as the family’s enemies begin to multiply. The brothers go into business running a stagecoach line and repay all acts of violence perpetrated against them, which only worsens the situation.
    		 
    Refusing to take a backwards step, the Donnellys stand alone against a growing power base that includes wealthy business interests in the town of Lucan, the local diocese of the Roman Catholic Church, law authorities and a number of their neighbours.
    Show book
  • Raven - cover

    Raven

    Sam Michaels

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    She's out of retirement – and out for revenge
     
    When Georgina Garrett wakes in the night to find intruders in her house, she knows she must do everything she can to keep her children safe.
     
    But just when she thinks the ordeal is over, she realises something is terribly wrong. She arrives at her crime-lord husband David Maynard's London house to find a bloodbath. Six of David's best men lie dead and he is nowhere to be found.
     
    Georgina may have walked away from the game but she's still the best player on the street. Now, she will stop at nothing to get her husband back and to make whoever took him pay for ever daring to set foot in her town.
     
    'Terrific – read it and be hooked!' - bestselling author Jessie Keane on Trickster
     
    Readers are loving RAVEN! 
     
    'Fast moving, gritty and not for the faint hearted' ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
     
    'Another fantastic episode in the series' ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
     
    'Yet another amazing book by Sam Michaels' ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
     
    'Gritty, violent, edge-of-your-seat tension. The end – phew!' ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
     
    'This is a BRILLIANT book and Sam's fans will love it. Worthy of more than 5 stars!' ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
    Show book
  • Bird Songs Don't Lie - Writings from the Rez - cover

    Bird Songs Don't Lie - Writings...

    Gordon Lee Johnson

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    In this collection of essays and short stories, the Native American author explores reservation life through a range of genres and perspectives. 
     
    In this moving collection, Gordon Lee Johnson (Cupeño/Cahuilla) distinguishes himself not only as a wry commentator on American Indian reservation life but also as a master of fiction writing. In Johnson’s stories, all of which are set on the fictional San Ignacio reservation in Southern California, we meet unforgettable characters like Plato Pena, the Stanford-bound geek who reads Kahlil Gibran during intertribal softball games; hardboiled investigator Roddy Foo; and Etta, whose motto is “early to bed, early to rise, work like hell, and advertise,” as they face down circumstances by turns ordinary and devastating. 
     
    The nonfiction featured in Bird Songs Don’t Lie is equally revelatory in its exploration of complex connections between past and present. Whether examining his own conflicted feelings toward the missions as a source of both cultural damage and identity or sharing advice for cooking for eight dozen cowboys and -girls, Johnson plumbs the comedy, catastrophe, and beauty of his life on the Pala Reservation to thunderous effect.
    Show book
  • Hegel's Philosophy of Mind - cover

    Hegel's Philosophy of Mind

    Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The knowledge of Mind is the highest and hardest, just because it is the most “concrete” of sciences. The significance of that “absolute” commandment, Know thyself—whether we look at it in itself or under the historical circumstances of its first utterance—is not to promote mere self-knowledge in respect of the particular capacities, character, propensities, and foibles of the single self. The knowledge it commands means that of man's genuine reality—of what is essentially and ultimately true and real—of mind as the true and essential being. Equally little is it the purport of mental philosophy to teach what is called knowledge of men—the knowledge whose aim is to detect the peculiarities, passions, and foibles of other men, and lay bare what are called the recesses of the human heart. Information of this kind is, for one thing, meaningless, unless on the assumption that we know the universal—man as man, and, that always must be, as mind. And for another, being only engaged with casual, insignificant and untrue aspects of mental life, it fails to reach the underlying essence of them all—the mind itself.
    Show book