Reading without limits, the perfect plan for #stayhome
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Graphic Satire in the Soviet Union - Krokodil's Political Cartoons - cover

Graphic Satire in the Soviet Union - Krokodil's Political Cartoons

John Etty

Publisher: University Press of Mississippi

  • 1
  • 2
  • 0

Summary

After the death of Joseph Stalin, Soviet-era Russia experienced a flourishing artistic movement due to relaxed censorship and new economic growth. In this new atmosphere of freedom, Russia's satirical magazine Krokodil (The Crocodile) became rejuvenated. John Etty explores Soviet graphic satire through Krokodil and its political cartoons. He investigates the forms, production, consumption, and functions of Krokodil, focusing on the period from 1954 to 1964.Krokodil remained the longest-serving and most important satirical journal in the Soviet Union, unique in producing state-sanctioned graphic satirical comment on Soviet and international affairs for over seventy years. Etty's analysis of Krokodil extends and enhances our understanding of Soviet graphic satire beyond state-sponsored propaganda.For most of its life, Krokodil consisted of a sixteen-page satirical magazine comprising a range of cartoons, photographs, and verbal texts. Authored by professional and nonprofessional contributors and published by Pravda in Moscow, it produced state-sanctioned satirical comment on Soviet and international affairs from 1922 onward. Soviet citizens and scholars of the USSR recognized Krokodil as the most significant, influential source of Soviet graphic satire. Indeed, the magazine enjoyed an international reputation, and many Americans and Western Europeans, regardless of political affiliation, found the images pointed and witty. Astoundingly, the magazine outlived the USSR but until now has received little scholarly attention.

Other books that might interest you

  • Such Sweet Sorrow - cover

    Such Sweet Sorrow

    Richard Bell

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    ‘With this moving free verse arising from his sustained encounter with his wife’s cancer, Richard Bell lays bare the intimate reality of loss, from its dark foreshadowing in her fatal diagnosis through the rigors of her treatment to the persistence of her presence even in the yawning absence that followed her death.  In raw honesty and occasional buffering irony, with unconventional images that startle the reader into fresh acts of perception, this poetry illuminates an intimate journey that touched me with both its universality for all mortal beings and with the ultimate particularity that distinguishes each shared life from all others. I recommend it to all of those who stand in the shadow of loss, as well as to readers who seek a deeper understanding of those who do.’ – Robert A. Neimeyer, author of Techniques of Grief Therapy, The Art of Longing, and Rainbow in the Stone
    Show book
  • Barracoon - The Story of the Last "Black Cargo" - cover

    Barracoon - The Story of the...

    Zora Neale Hurston

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    New York Times Bestseller •  TIME Magazine’s Best Nonfiction Book of 2018 • New York Public Library’s Best Book of 2018 • NPR’s Book Concierge Best Book of 2018 • Economist Book of the Year • SELF.com’s Best Books of 2018 • Audible’s Best of the Year • BookRiot’s Best Audio Books of 2018 • The Atlantic’s Books Briefing: History, Reconsidered • Atlanta Journal Constitution, Best Southern Books 2018  • The Christian Science Monitor’s Best Books 2018 •  
     
     
    “A profound impact on Hurston’s literary legacy.”—New York Times 
    “One of the greatest writers of our time.”—Toni Morrison 
    “Zora Neale Hurston’s genius has once again produced a Maestrapiece.”—Alice Walker 
    A major literary event: a newly published work from the author of the American classic Their Eyes Were Watching God, with a foreword from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker, brilliantly illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of one of the last-known survivors of the Atlantic slave trade—abducted from Africa on the last "Black Cargo" ship to arrive in the United States. 
    In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation’s history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo’s firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States. 
    In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo’s past—memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilda, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War. 
    Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo’s unique vernacular, and written from Hurston’s perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, Barracoon masterfully illustrates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.
    Show book
  • Homing Birds - cover

    Homing Birds

    Rukhsana Ahmad

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Reversing the usual refugee story clichés, Homing Birds shares the hopes, fears and aspirations of a young man searching for a place in which he feels he truly belongs.
     
    Young Afghan refugee Saeed desperately wants to reconnect with his roots and find his long-lost sister. So he leaves his adoptive family in London and returns home to Kabul to work as a doctor, eager to contribute to rebuilding a new Afghanistan.
     
    But as past and present collide, Saeed must face up to the reality of his changed world. This captivating and evocative play asks if a place can ever be home without a connection to family and roots?
    
     
    RUKHSANA AHMAD
     
    Award-winning writer Rukhsana Ahmad has written and adapted many plays for stage and BBC Radio. River on Fire was a finalist in the Susan Smith Blackburn Awards, Wide Sargasso Sea was a finalist for the Writers’ Guild Award for Best Radio Adaptation and Song for a Sanctuary was a finalist for the CRE award for best original radio drama. Other plays include Mistaken: Annie Besant in India and Letting Go.
     
    She has also written fiction: The Hope Chest and The Gatekeeper’s Wife and other stories.  She has also translated We Sinful Women, a collection of contemporary Urdu feminist poetry and The One Who Did Not Ask by Altaf Fatima.
     
     REVIEWS OF PREVIOUS WORK
     
    “... the debates about belief and faith are clear and compelling and the play also bravely grapples with big spiritual ideas...”                                                                     – Aleks Sierz, theatre critic
     
    “... sensitive approach gives painful credibility to the dilemmas facing women with nowhere else to go.”                                                                                  – The Independent
    Show book
  • Marine I SBS - Escape from Azerbaijan - cover

    Marine I SBS - Escape from...

    David Monnery

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    In 1995, in the aftermath of the First Gulf War, a defector from Saddam Hussein's Iraq makes contact with the Western press. He claims to have startling new information about an Iraqi nuclear weapons programme, but suddenly he disappears without a trace. Unwilling to risk a new war in the Gulf, the West disregards him as a fraud, but a key scientific advisor to the British government has other ideas. 
     
    When news of a hush-hush project on a converted rig in the Caspian Sea breaks with reports of another disappearance – this time of a nuclear missile expert – the threads of an international plot are unravelled. It soon becomes clear that there is only one group with the necessary skills to investigate: Britain's legendary Special Boat Squadron. 
     
    Marine I SBS: Escape from Azerbaijan finds the Squadron's finest in a corner of the old Soviet Union  riven by war and lawlessness, fighting for survival against the sadistic intelligence agents of Saddam's Mukhabarat and the heirs of the KGB. 
     
    This is classic military fiction at its best.
    Show book
  • The Undiscovered Self - With Symbols and the Interpretation of Dreams - cover

    The Undiscovered Self - With...

    C. G. Jung

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    These two essays, written late in Jung's life, reflect his responses to the shattering experience of World War II and the dawn of mass society. Among his most influential works, "The Undiscovered Self" is a plea for his generation--and those to come--to continue the individual work of self-discovery and not abandon needed psychological reflection for the easy ephemera of mass culture. Only individual awareness of both the conscious and unconscious aspects of the human psyche, Jung tells us, will allow the great work of human culture to continue and thrive. 
      Jung's reflections on self-knowledge and the exploration of the unconscious carry over into the second essay, "Symbols and the Interpretation of Dreams," completed shortly before his death in 1961. Describing dreams as communications from the unconscious, Jung explains how the symbols that occur in dreams compensate for repressed emotions and intuitions. This essay brings together Jung's fully evolved thoughts on the analysis of dreams and the healing of the rift between consciousness and the unconscious, ideas that are central to his system of psychology. 
      This paperback edition of Jung's classic work includes a new foreword by Sonu Shamdasani, Philemon Professor of Jung History at University College London.
    Show book
  • Jung on Active Imagination - cover

    Jung on Active Imagination

    C. G. Jung

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    All the creative art psychotherapies (art, dance, music, drama, poetry) can trace their roots to C. G. Jung's early work on active imagination. Joan Chodorow here offers a collection of Jung's writings on active imagination, gathered together for the first time. Jung developed this concept between the years 1913 and 1916, following his break with Freud. During this time, he was disoriented and experienced intense inner turmoil --he suffered from lethargy and fears, and his moods threatened to overwhelm him. Jung searched for a method to heal himself from within, and finally decided to engage with the impulses and images of his unconscious. It was through the rediscovery of the symbolic play of his childhood that Jung was able to reconnect with his creative spirit. In a 1925 seminar and again in his memoirs, he tells the remarkable story of his experiments during this time that led to his self-healing. Jung learned to develop an ongoing relationship with his lively creative spirit through the power of imagination and fantasies. He termed this therapeutic method "active imagination." 
     This method is based on the natural healing function of the imagination, and its many expressions. Chodorow clearly presents the texts, and sets them in the proper context. She also interweaves her discussion of Jung's writings and ideas with contributions from Jungian authors and artists.
    Show book