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To Kill and Kill Again - The Terrifying True Story of Montana's Baby-Faced Serial Sex Murderer - cover

To Kill and Kill Again - The Terrifying True Story of Montana's Baby-Faced Serial Sex Murderer

John Coston

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

The twelve-year rampage of “Missoula Mauler” Wayne Nance—and the shocking end to his murder spree To his neighbors, Wayne Nance, a furniture mover from Missoula, Montana, appeared to be an affable, considerate, and trustworthy guy. No one knew that Nance was the “Missoula Mauler,” a psychopath responsible for a series of sadistic sex slayings that rocked the idyllic town between 1974 and 1986.   Nance’s only requirement for murder was accessibility—a preacher’s wife, a teenage runaway, a female acquaintance, a married couple. Putting on a friendly façade, he could easily gain his victims’ trust. Then, one September night, thirty-year-old Nance pushed his luck, preying on a couple who lived to tell the tale.   A true story with an incredible twist, written by former Wall Street Journal editor John Coston and complete with photos, To Kill and Kill Again reveals the disturbing compulsions of a charming serial killer who fooled everyone he knew, stumped the authorities, terrified a community, and nearly got away with it.  

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