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Toponymity - An Atlas of Words - cover

Toponymity - An Atlas of Words

John Bemelmans Marciano

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA

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Summary

toponymity , n. The condition of being named after a geographic location. 
 
It's no secret that America's cookouts owe a lot to the German towns  
of Frankfurt and Hamburg. Likewise, we know when we put on the wool of a 
 goat from India's Kashmir valley. But did you know that the town of  
Spa, Belgium, bequeathed to us a new form of healthy relaxation? Or that 
 Tuxedo Park, New York, brought Americans a staple of formal wear? These 
 towns, it turns out, are just the tip of the iceberg. 
 
In this ingenious follow-up to Anonyponymous, John Bemelmans  
Marciano takes us on a lively tour of American, European, and world  
history, showing us our linguistic heritage in all its richness and, to  
use another toponym, serendipity. Dotted with Marciano's signature witty 
 drawings and topical essays, this book is a joy to browse and sure to  
impress your friends. It makes a perfect book for language lovers,  
whether they come from Cologne, Germany, or Bikini Island.

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