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F*ck the Details - Fewer words Sharper stories - cover

F*ck the Details - Fewer words Sharper stories

Joel Quinn

Publisher: Sterling & Stone

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Summary

Fewer words. Sharper stories. Bigger impact.
 
Are you getting bogged down in lengthy prose and bloated descriptions? Time to say F*ck the Details and write stories that move!
 
Descriptive elements don't have to be speed bumps that grind everything to a halt. Ditch the fluff and craft lean stories that grab your readers by the eyeballs and pack a bone-crunching punch.
 
In this quick read you will learn how to:
 
- Write description that leverages common knowledge and the experience of the reader to omit details that the reader can imagine for you.
 
- Show a character’s frame of mind with action, keeping the story moving.
 
- Identify which details to keep and which to throw away.
 
Through Joel’s before-and-after story examples, you won’t just learn what effective descriptions look like ... you’ll understand how to craft them for yourself.
 
Trim the bloat. Up the action. F*ck the Details!

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