Subscribe and enjoy more than 800,000 books
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Death Sentence - The Inside Story of the John List Murders - cover

Death Sentence - The Inside Story of the John List Murders

Joe Sharkey

Publisher: Open Road Media

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

The true account of the man who murdered his family in their New Jersey mansion—and eluded a nationwide manhunt for eighteen years. Until 1971, life was good for mild-mannered accountant John List. He was vice president of a Jersey City bank and had moved his mother, wife, and three teenage children into a nineteen-room home in Westfield, New Jersey. But all that changed when he lost his job. Raised by his Lutheran father to believe success meant being a good provider, List saw himself as an utter failure. Straining under financial burdens, the stress of hiding his unemployment, as well as the fear that the free-spirited 1970s would corrupt the souls of his children, List came to a shattering conclusion.   “It was my belief that if you kill yourself, you won’t go to heaven,” List told Connie Chung in a television interview. “So eventually I got to the point where I felt that I could kill them. Hopefully they would go to heaven, and then maybe I would have a chance to later confess my sins to God and get forgiveness.”   List methodically shot his entire family in their home, managing to conceal the deaths for weeks with a carefully orchestrated plan of deception. Then he vanished and started over as Robert P. Clark. Chronicling List’s life before and after the grisly crime, Death Sentence exposes the truth about the accountant-turned-killer, including his revealing letter to his pastor, his years as a fugitive with a new name—and a new wife—his eventual arrest, and the details of his high-profile trial.  Revised and updated, this ebook also includes photos.  

Other books that might interest you

  • The Children of Castletown House - cover

    The Children of Castletown House

    Sarah Conolly-Carew

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Castletown House, Ireland's largest and earliest Palladian-style house, was built between 1722 and 1729 for William Conolly, Speaker of the Irish House of Commons and the wealthiest commoner in Ireland. In 1967, the house was bought by the Hon. Desmond Guinness, founder of the Irish Georgian Society and opened to the public. In 1994, ownership of the house was transferred to the State, and it is now managed by the Office of Public Works.
    
    Castletown House, a history, is the story of that house, written by the children who grew up there, Baroness Diana Wrangle Conolly Carew, the Hon. Sarah McPherson & their brother, the Hon. Gerald Edward Ian Maitland-Carew.
    
    In this fascinating history, the character of the house is brought to life through its former residents, together with stories of their Olympic medals, the chance survival of the house through the Civil War, and tales of visiting royalty to the greatest of Ireland’s great houses.
    Show book
  • The Chilli Bean Paste Clan - cover

    The Chilli Bean Paste Clan

    Yan Ge

    • 1
    • 4
    • 0
    Set in a fictional town in West China, this is the story of the Duan-Xue family, owners of the lucrative chilli bean paste factory, and their formidable matriarch. As Gran’s eightieth birthday approaches, her middle-aged children get together to make preparations. Family secrets are revealed and long-time sibling rivalries flare up with renewed vigour. As Shengqiang struggles unsuccessfully to juggle the demands of his mistress and his wife, the biggest surprises of all come from Gran herself……     
    (Winner of English Pen Award) 
    
    “Yan Ge’s writing is outstandingly imaginative… The Chilli Bean Paste Clan delves deep into the pettiness and shortcomings of family relationships, dissecting them with remarkable insight and humour.... Yan Ge is not just a talented story-teller, she is also a versatile stylist, able to put her mastery of the local dialect to excellent use.” —China Literature Media Award judging panel, 2013 
    “A fascinating glimpse into the life of a dysfunctional family in modern China.”—Marina Lewycka, author of A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian 
     
    Show book
  • (Not Quite) Mastering the Art of French Living - cover

    (Not Quite) Mastering the Art of...

    Mark Greenside

    • 3
    • 4
    • 0
    Author’s first English-language work since his popular 2009 memoir, I’ll Never Be French, the best-selling and most well-known book in English about outsiders living in Brittany
    
    France is in top 10 most popular expat destinations for Americans; around 100,000 currently living in the country; around 2-3 million Americans travel to France every year
    
    Book appeals to both loyal fans and new discoverers as it both continues previous story and is readable on its own
    
    Offers practical wisdom for visitors to France as well as an engaging narrative for the armchair traveler
    
    Release date scheduled just before start of summer 2018 and vacation season
    
    Author maintains updated website, mailing list that reaches ~1,000 fans, and quarterly newsletter with updates on book and life
    Show book
  • My Animal Life - A Memoir - cover

    My Animal Life - A Memoir

    Maggie Gee

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    How do you become a writer, and why? Maggie Gee's journey starts a long way from the literary world in a small family in post-war Britain. At seventeen, Maggie goes, a lamb to the slaughter, to university. From the 1960s onwards she lives the defining events of her generation: the coming of the Pill and sexual freedom, tremors in the British layer-cake of class and race. In the 1980s, Maggie finally gets published, falls in love, marries and has a daughter -- but for the next three decades and beyond, she survives, and sometimes thrives, by writing. This frank, bold memoir dares to explore the big questions: success and failure, sex, death and parenthood -- our animal life. 'A wise and beautiful book about what it feels like to be alive -- I really loved it' Zadie Smith 'Exceptionally interesting and brave ... a wonderful book' Claire Tomalin 'A fine, honest, complex portrait of an artist's mind' Michele Roberts, Independent 'Every word strikes like a hammer on an anvil, throwing off sizzling sparks' Bidisha, The f word 'Anyone who yearns for that lost post-war Britain would do well to read this vivid, minutely observed memoir ...Gee has a sensuous eye for detail' Sinclair McKay, Telegraph 'It is a testament to Gee's skill with structure, her lightness of touch and her honesty, particularly about the most painful episodes, that she has fashioned this account of a fundamentally satisfying and happy writer's life into such a page-turner.' Melissa Benn, New Statesman 'Maggie Gee writes with such courage and wit. This is a vivid portrait of a woman finding her way through the maze of class ridden post war England, the 60's, feminism and how to be a mother and a writer.' Diana Melly 'Highly recommended for all aspiring writers' Bernardine Evaristo 'Observant, honest and sensitively-written...' Michael Holroyd 'Fresh and funny ... with a zest for living that bounces off the page...' Psychologies 'Sensitive, honest, courageous, stylish' The Times '[Gee's] utterly compelling on the rollercoaster of writing life, from early success to rock-bottom rejection. Often joyous; infinitely wise; passionate and poised, this is a book you'll want to sit in silence with and hug to yourself -- then start again.' Daily Mail
    Show book
  • Dracula (1897) by Bram Stoker (Original Version) - cover

    Dracula (1897) by Bram Stoker...

    Bram Stoker

    • 0
    • 8
    • 0
    Dracula is an 1897 novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, featuring as its primary antagonist the vampire Count Dracula.
    
    Dracula has been attributed to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, the gothic novel and invasion literature. Structurally it is an epistolary novel, that is, told as a series of diary entries and letters. Literary critics have examined many themes in the novel, such as the role of women in Victorian culture, conventional and conservative sexuality, immigration, colonialism, postcolonialism and folklore. Although Stoker did not invent the vampire, the novel's influence on the popularity of vampires has been singularly responsible for many theatrical and film interpretations throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.
    Show book
  • Mrs Guinness - The Rise and Fall of Diana Mitford the Thirties Socialite - cover

    Mrs Guinness - The Rise and Fall...

    Lyndsy Spence

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Before Diana Mosley (neé Mitford) became a social pariah, she was a principal member of the Bright Young Things set in London's 1920s and '30s high society. As the young wife of Bryan Guinness, heir to the Guinness family brewing empire, she lived a gilded life until fascist leader Oswald Mosley turned her head. This ground-breaking biography adopts a new approach in exploring the life of Diana Mitford - removing her from her famous family and fascism to look at the woman behind the myths. Combining the traditional rituals of the upper classes - the debutante season, social movements of the 1920s and social upheaval of the 1930s - allows Diana to be presented as a young woman desperately trying to find her place in a rapidly changing world. Benefitting from never-before published letters, diaries and archives has allowed her story to take shape. It is a character study of a beautiful woman whose charm and personality enthralled all who met her, but whose life would ultimately act as a cautionary tale.
    Show book