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Jane Annie - Or The Good Conduct Prize - cover

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Jane Annie - Or The Good Conduct Prize

J.M. Barrie and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Publisher: Mint Editions

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Summary

Janie Annie is an overzealous schoolgirl who plans to win the hearts and minds of the student body before revealing her true character and intent. She has a rare skill that allows her to subvert authority and any subsequent punishment. Janie Annie attends a small boarding school near a college town. The all-girl facility is run by Miss Sims who is very strict and powerful. When one of the students reveals a secret to her peers, Janie Annie runs to Miss Sims and discloses the information. Janie Annie attempts to foil one mischievous plot after another, earning the trust of the school’s staff. When she wins the coveted Good Conduct Prize, Janie Annie changes her tune to reveal a darker, more sinister side. Everything isn’t always as it seems. Janie Annie, or The Good Conduct Prize is a two-act play that shows the evolution of an ambitious girl who takes desperate measures to achieve her goals. This is a compelling and entertaining story with a surprising end. With an eye-catching new cover, and professionally typeset manuscript, this edition of  Janie Annie, or The Good Conduct Prize is both modern and readable.

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