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The Three Count - My Life in Stripes as a WWE Referee - cover

The Three Count - My Life in Stripes as a WWE Referee

Jimmy Korderas

Publisher: ECW Press

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Summary

Highlighting the triumphs and tragedies Jimmy Korderas experienced, this entertaining biography focuses on his20-year career as a World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) referee. For the first time, Korderas talks about the harrowing experience of being in the ring during Owen HartÓ³ accident and about the horrific effects of the Chris Benoit tragedy - the most difficult moments of his life in wrestling. The book also includes untold stories from bothinside and outside the ring, highlighting the bonds Korderas formed with WWE superstars such as Eddie Guerrero, Edge, John Cena, "Stone Cold" Steve Austin, Christian, and Chris Jericho. A fun read from a man who, rather than having an ax to grind, wants to inspire wrestling fans and prove that dreams do come true.

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