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The Real Dirt on America's Frontier Legends - cover

The Real Dirt on America's Frontier Legends

Jim Motavalli

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

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Summary

Characters like Daniel Boone, Davy Crocket, “Buffalo Bill” Cody, and Jim Bridger have fascinated people for generations. But thanks to penny dreadfuls, Wild West shows, sensationalist newspaper stories, and tall tales, what we know is often fiction. The Real Dirt separates fact from fiction, showing the real story of the old West.

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