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Release Your Inner Roman - A Treatise by Nobleman Marcus Sidonius Falx - cover

Release Your Inner Roman - A Treatise by Nobleman Marcus Sidonius Falx

Jerry Toner

Publisher: ABRAMS Press

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Summary

Learn the secrets to conquering the world like a Caesar: “A fun concept and an entertaining way to teach the history of Roman society” (Historical Novel Society).   Following his “ingenious” handbook on slave management, here is Marcus Sidonius Falx’s new guide on how to improve every aspect of your barbarian life (The New Yorker). Up to now, most barbarians have had to settle for marveling at the Romans’ achievements. This guide from one of its leading aristocrats lets you into the secrets of Rome’s success.   Outlining the personal characteristics that have made the Romans the most successful people in history, he shows how you too can learn from their example. He reveals the ways in which Romans approach their work and how they boost their career prospects. He explains how to control your emotions, especially when involved in the difficult process of conquering others. He covers the delicate subject of managing your love life, choosing a suitable wife, and then maintaining control over your family.   Supported by his practical wisdom, you’ll discover how to raise yourself up in society, enjoy the good life, and keep the gods on your side. Based on a wealth of original sources, this book lets us understand the society behind the greatest empire the world has ever known.   “At times laugh-out-loud funny and at others shocking . . . A very useful guide to the real-life customs of its era.” —The Washington Independent Review of Books

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