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The Women Who Dared - To Break All the Rules - cover

The Women Who Dared - To Break All the Rules

Jeremy Scott

Publisher: Oneworld Publications

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Summary

In 1870 Victoria Woodhull was the first woman to run for president of the USA
Mary Wollstonecraft wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, the first feminist manifesto, published in 1792
  Aimee Semple McPherson escaped a hardscrabble upbringing to found an international church
Edwina Mountbatten scandalised society and became a secular saint
Margaret Argyll brought the British establishment to its knees
Coco Chanel, the French couturier, rewrote the fashion rulebook when she created her eponymous brand.

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